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Cold crashing/stabilization of wine

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Sourgrape

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Today I noticed a sidebar in the instructions for my Cellar Craft Showcase kit regarding cold stabilization at 29F to 35F for a week to 10 days prior to bottling. I had no idea wine could be cold crashed! I am already completely set up for this (freezer with temp control) as I have been cold crashing beer for a long time. I've reviewed the other threads for cold stabilisation, but have a couple of nagging concerns:

1) Cold liquid holds a lot more CO2 than warm. Will this be a problem? The wine will have been thoroughly degased long before this of course. But is there a chance the wine might pick up or absorb some CO2 somehow while chilling, and then end up in the bottles?

2) I don't like the idea of bottling cold. Wouldn't that create a lot of pressure when they warm up to cellar temp? Would it be better to allow the wine to warm up in the bottling bucket prior to bottling?
 

pjd

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Today I noticed a sidebar in the instructions for my Cellar Craft Showcase kit regarding cold stabilization at 29F to 35F for a week to 10 days prior to bottling. I had no idea wine could be cold crashed! I am already completely set up for this (freezer with temp control) as I have been cold crashing beer for a long time. I've reviewed the other threads for cold stabilisation, but have a couple of nagging concerns:

1) Cold liquid holds a lot more CO2 than warm. Will this be a problem? The wine will have been thoroughly degased long before this of course. But is there a chance the wine might pick up or absorb some CO2 somehow while chilling, and then end up in the bottles?

2) I don't like the idea of bottling cold. Wouldn't that create a lot of pressure when they warm up to cellar temp? Would it be better to allow the wine to warm up in the bottling bucket prior to bottling?
No worries on picking up or absorbing more co2 but do let the wine warm to room temperature before bottling. Chances are you will need to rack the wine after being cooled. you're likely to drop out lots of acid crystals.
 

Sourgrape

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Definitely I would rack while cold. That would prevent any solids from re-absorbing as it warmed. That's what I do with beer. Also, my freezer is elevated on an old IKEA coffee table, so I can siphon right out of the carboy in the freezer without disturbing it.

So, my process would be this:

1) Cold stabilise for 2 weeks or so at maybe 28F
2) Rack to bottling bucket cold
3) Allow wine to warm up to cellar temperature (around 60 F)
4) Add 1/8 tsp K-meta
5) Bottle & cork

...you're likely to drop out lots of acid crystals.

Does this risk altering the flavour or body of the wine at all? Am I potentially reducing the acidity too much by cold stabilizing? Or dropping out some other substances that I might want in there?
 
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Johnd

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Definitely I would rack while cold. That would prevent any solids from re-absorbing as it warmed. That's what I do with beer. Also, my freezer is elevated on an old IKEA coffee table, so I can siphon right out of the carboy in the freezer without disturbing it.

So, my process would be this:

1) Cold stabilise for 2 weeks or so at maybe 28F
2) Rack to bottling bucket cold
3) Allow wine to warm up to cellar temperature (around 60 F)
4) Add 1/8 tsp K-meta
5) Bottle & cork

...you're likely to drop out lots of acid crystals.

Does this risk altering the flavour or body of the wine at all? Am I potentially reducing the acidity too much by cold stabilizing? Or dropping out some other substances that I might want in there?
it is dependent upon the starting pH of the wine. If it's below 3.6, the pH will decrease (increasing the acidity), if the starting pH is above 3.6, the pH will increase (decreasing the acidity). Changes in pH affect the taste of wine, sometimes for the better, sometimes not. You should understand the effects of CS and know whether or not you will be improving your wine or not before you undertake it, and that's a matter of taste............
 

DoctorCAD

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Cold crashing wine is specifically done to get rid of acid. That changes the flavor profiles.
 
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