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Cleaning time for One-Step no rinse cleaner

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Braden

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First wine kit I’ve ever done and just moved everything into the secondary car boy yesterday. I’ve been doing my sanitizing before anything touches the wine. I just realized from online that One-Step requires a 2 minute contact time. I never knew and kinda just washed my stuff with a clean rag and soaked my equipment for maybe 30 seconds or so if that. Anyone think I’ll have any problems? I did taste my wine the other day when moving it into the secondary car boy and it didn’t taste spoiled or bad.
 

NorCal

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Should be fine. I have had items see the wine before the 2 minutes, but getting all the items sanitized before you start an activity is a good habit to form.
 

Rice_Guy

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KEY . . . Does it look clean?
I just realized from online that One-Step requires a 2 minute contact time. I never knew and kinda just washed my stuff with a clean rag and soaked my equipment for maybe 30 seconds.
* it would be interesting to see the studies behind 2 minutes, a few decades ago micro class taught that washing with cold water would remove three log cycles of micro population (1000/1), hot water another log and soap water another log beyond that (100,000/1)
* a lot of stainless steel is cleaned to produce visually clean
* a lot of stainless steel is cleaned with clean in place sprays, we know that cleaners that oxidize are good at removing color and don’t necessarily get all the “dirt/foreign material”
* yes, industry does worry about scratches, cracks in gaskets, dead ends where dirt can build up.
* Pasteur did his discoveries in the mid 1800s, we first started to learn about yeast, acetobacter etc, etc 150 years ago. I will guess a lot of sanitation training started 100 years ago, , , have to wonder how we managed before one step with 2 minutes contact time,

we now know there are several preservatives synergistically working that combine to make wine safe (alcohol, pH, SO2, low nutrient content, anaerobic environment, CO2, etc). The biggest factor still is, does it look clean?
 

ras2018

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To be clear one step is a cleanser and typically is used in tandem with some other sanitizer such as StarSan. If you are only using one step, you aren’t truly “sanitizing”. No idea what the implications are of this, but thought I’d chime in.
 

Braden

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When I purchased it online it says cleanser/sanitizer. After doing research it’s like up in the air. Some are saying it sanitizes some say it doesn’t. Some are saying it turns into hydrogen peroxide and that kills bacteria. So hopefully all goes well with my wine because that’s all I have used thinking it was a true sanitizer. It’s in the secondary Carboy right now clarifying. All looks good. How would I tell if it’s bad without having to taste it?
 

cmason1957

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When I purchased it online it says cleanser/sanitizer. After doing research it’s like up in the air. Some are saying it sanitizes some say it doesn’t. Some are saying it turns into hydrogen peroxide and that kills bacteria. So hopefully all goes well with my wine because that’s all I have used thinking it was a true sanitizer. It’s in the secondary Carboy right now clarifying. All looks good. How would I tell if it’s bad without having to taste it?
I would assume it is good and your wine is fine. One of the good things about wine is that the relatively acidic environment makes it harder for anything to infect your wine. It can be done, so sanitation is important. I have trouble believing anything can do both, but who knows. I would continue to use the One step, until you run out of it, augmented with potassium metabisulphite for sanitation or Star San. In the future Oxyclean Free makes a great, less expensive alternative.
 

CDrew

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I thought One Step was basically the same chemistry as Oxyclean, so it should be an excellent cleaner, removes biofilms etc. I also thought they dropped the sanitizer claim. And looking at pictures of it, it just says "cleanser"

<img src="https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/2785/6868/products/OneStep-Packaging_x700.jpg?v=1571725280" alt="One Step Cleaner"/>

Anyway, I've never used it, but used plenty of PBW and Oxyclean followed by StarSan.

from Northern Brewer: (note the "some" and "most")
"Note: while technically a cleanser, One Step does have some sanitizing properties through the release of hydrogen peroxide. It can be used in no-rinse applications in most home brewing tasks."
 

hounddawg

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I would assume it is good and your wine is fine. One of the good things about wine is that the relatively acidic environment makes it harder for anything to infect your wine. It can be done, so sanitation is important. I have trouble believing anything can do both, but who knows. I would continue to use the One step, until you run out of it, augmented with potassium metabisulphite for sanitation or Star San. In the future Oxyclean Free makes a great, less expensive alternative.
so let me ask, what yawl are saying is potassium metabisulphite alone for sanitation is not enough, the reason i ask is i came up on this post and sine i started in 13 making wine instead of sprists all i've ever clean with has been potassium metabisulphite for both my cleaning and sterilizing
Dawg
 

cmason1957

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so let me ask, what yawl are saying is potassium metabisulphite alone for sanitation is not enough, the reason i ask is i came up on this post and sine i started in 13 making wine instead of sprists all i've ever clean with has been potassium metabisulphite for both my cleaning and sterilizing
Dawg
Potassium metabisulphite is a sanitizing agent, a clean carboy takes both cleaning (Oxyclean Free for me) with some elbow grease and then sanitizing. Cleaning means removing any visible gunk, and that's a technical term. Then sanitizing.
 

hounddawg

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oh, ok, so i have always did excessive scrubbing then after everything spotless then i potassium metabisulphite, i had misunderstood then thank you, after all where i'm from we say you learn till you die and that is the last lesson,,
thank you cmason19578
Dawg
 

Rice_Guy

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oh, ok, so i have always did excessive scrubbing then after everything spotless.
Commercially sterile is defined as removing nine log cycles of microbial count, your scrubbing everything spotless with water is getting you much of the way to being commercially sterile. That said we can’t scrub tubing and shouldn’t excessively scrub plastic tanks so chemically removing dirt with oxyclean is the best option after flushing/ spraying.

In the primary I can argue for sanitizing since you are starting with no yeast population. After racking you already have built up some alcohol and CO so you have built in sanitizers, , , (wine is a preservative system) , , , likewise the built up yeast population will overwhelm infections till it runs out of sugar and becomes inactive.
The main time I would worry about having sanitized is if the equipment was used for other fermentation’s as sour kraut or kombucha where I had large populations which could produce volatile acidity.
 

montanarick

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The June-July 2016 issue of Winemaker Magazine has a comprehensive article on cleaners/sanitizers
 

hounddawg

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Commercially sterile is defined as removing nine log cycles of microbial count, your scrubbing everything spotless with water is getting you much of the way to being commercially sterile. That said we can’t scrub tubing and shouldn’t excessively scrub plastic tanks so chemically removing dirt with oxyclean is the best option after flushing/ spraying.

In the primary I can argue for sanitizing since you are starting with no yeast population. After racking you already have built up some alcohol and CO so you have built in sanitizers, , , (wine is a preservative system) , , , likewise the built up yeast population will overwhelm infections till it runs out of sugar and becomes inactive.
The main time I would worry about having sanitized is if the equipment was used for other fermentation’s as sour kraut or kombucha where I had large populations which could produce volatile acidity.
Thank you Rice_Guy,
i have always cleaned what is scrubbable, old carpenter so special water heater ran to my Stainless Steel Commercial 3 basin sink, so water at different times cold first, then very hot, then potassium metabisulphite, as for my lines, I flush with cold, then scalding hot water then i fill my lines with a potassium metabisulphite mixed in a special carboy that i use to fill my lines and my filter housings,my lines are replaced yearly,my filters, I get a case of 50 for each size micron wise- 1 micron an 5 micron, i seen an earlier post, that made me wonder if i needed to use a second chemical, knock on wood, i've 'yet to get spoilage, but one must keep learning as one lives,,
 

jking

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I use one of these long pipe cleaner brushes for my racking canes and racking tubing, long enough to clean it from both sides. I also have a pond pump that goes into a bucket of cleaner with different attachments for flushing tubing, rinsing carboys, etc. I make sure to clean after use then they get a quick sanitize with starsan before their next use. I have noticed that extended soaking in the cleaner makes my vinyl tubing hard so I make sure to rinse them with water after.
 

Rice_Guy

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Yes @dawg learning is part of being alive.:b

What I see as a contest judge is that roughly 3/4 of the bottles of fruit wine suffer from oxidation issues. About 1/25 of of small commercial wineries have volatile acidity which could be called a micro/cleaning issue however also implicates oxygen again. , , , ,

ie most of us home wine makers have more problem with air exposure than with microbiological contamination.
 

hounddawg

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I use one of these long pipe cleaner brushes for my racking canes and racking tubing, long enough to clean it from both sides. I also have a pond pump that goes into a bucket of cleaner with different attachments for flushing tubing, rinsing carboys, etc. I make sure to clean after use then they get a quick sanitize with starsan before their next use. I have noticed that extended soaking in the cleaner makes my vinyl tubing hard so I make sure to rinse them with water after.
yes i hear that, i use food grade silicone lines and my lines are 14 feet long, i buy my lines in 100 foot rolls, cost is much higher, but commercial grade lines will take much more then cheaper lines, most all my country wine are from early 1800's, i have modified them with the use of new sanitizers , yeast the very old timers on several alcohol types, by scraping unborn calve bellies. the new with the old, but there are choices here in america now that they did not have , see hillbillies had not much chance to get european yeast to cultivate,,, my tannins come from crabapples i raise,
 

hounddawg

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Yes @dawg learning is part of being alive.:b

What I see as a contest judge is that roughly 3/4 of the bottles of fruit wine suffer from oxidation issues. About 1/25 of of small commercial wineries have volatile acidity which could be called a micro/cleaning issue however also implicates oxygen again. , , , ,

ie most of us home wine makers have more problem with air exposure than with microbiological contamination.
you hit the nail on the head,
 

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