Quantcast

Other Chaptalization Sugars

Wine Making Talk

Help Support Wine Making Talk:

BigSell

Member
Joined
Jan 10, 2016
Messages
70
Reaction score
13
Checked the forum and did not find anything about the different types of sugars. I have some leftover Corn Sugar, can it be used for capitalization in wine making? All I see is refined sugar referenced.
 

Stressbaby

Just a Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2012
Messages
2,078
Reaction score
830
Not to be that guy, but FYI, it is "chaptalization"
 

Mismost

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2015
Messages
955
Reaction score
716
I have never done that with wine, but I have used corn and cane sugar when making beer...I could tell no difference, doubt the yeast can either.
 

richmke

Member
Joined
Oct 2, 2013
Messages
1,804
Reaction score
554
Corn sugar (Dextrose) is what you want, especially if you are intending to get close to the alcohol limit for your yeast. Dextrose is more easily used by yeast than table sugar (cane sugar).

Table sugar can be "inverted" to break it into Dextrose and Fructose before adding to your juice.

When I am boosting an Island Mist kit (a low alcohol kit), I use straight table sugar, as it is getting no where close to the alcohol tolerance of the yeast.
 

opus345

Senior Member
Joined
May 29, 2012
Messages
163
Reaction score
103
Here is a great article on chaptalization in WM magazine.

https://winemakermag.com/371-how-sweet-it-is-chaptalization

"What Kind of Sugar
Pure white table sugar is very effective. This may be beet, cane or corn sugar. Wine yeasts consume these easily, leaving no residual flavors. Many winemaking retailers offer pure white corn sugar for winemaking. Avoid castor and brown sugar, or anything that contains molasses. This will give your wine an undesirable taste. There are fancier fermentable sugars if you want to be particular, but for today we’ll keep it simple."
 
Top