Can it be as good?

Discussion in 'General Wine Making Forum' started by sgift, Oct 21, 2014.

Wine Making Forum

Help Support Winemaking Talk by donating:

  1. Oct 21, 2014 #1

    sgift

    sgift

    sgift

    Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2014
    Messages:
    92
    Likes Received:
    18
    Can kit wine be as good as store bought wines? As good as medium to high end wines? Some of my wine snob friends are looking down on my interest in making wine. I am enjoying the learning curve and I think it makes me appreciate any wine more. So the big question, is it as good? Can it be better?
     
  2. Oct 21, 2014 #2

    cpfan

    cpfan

    cpfan

    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2006
    Messages:
    4,867
    Likes Received:
    191
    sgift ... IMO, it depends on your tastes. As a general statement, I do not like commercial red wines. It may be the tannins. There are a lot of kit red wines that I do like. OTOH, I like commercial & kit whites.

    Who cares what your friends think? I like to take pictures of ships, and living near the Welland Canal makes that pretty easy. But friends and acquaintances often don't understand the interest.

    Steve
     
    olusteebus and tanddc like this.
  3. Oct 21, 2014 #3

    LoneStarLori

    LoneStarLori

    LoneStarLori

    Veteran wino, newbie vintner

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2013
    Messages:
    1,311
    Likes Received:
    562
    Snobs will be snobs. Can't change that. One of the ways I get my friends interested in trying my kit wine is, instead of calling it a kit, I say I buy a juice bucket or box then make the wine using my own tweaks or blending. Now I don't know anyone I would classify as a TRUE wine snob, but I have fans that are well versed in wine. You know, the person that always gets the job of ordering wine in a restaurant because they 'know so much? Honestly, I have been quite surprised at how many of them are impressed and ask for more.
    Can it be as good as a medium to high end wine? I am not going to fool myself into thinking I can make an Opus One from a kit. I'm pretty sure I couldn't do it from fresh grapes either. But, and this is just MY opinion, I can pull off a $20 wine for about $4 a bottle. I have plenty of family and friends that validate that for me every time they ask for more.

    Just enjoy your new hobby. If you enjoy your wine and love making it, that is all that really matters.
     
    MrKevin likes this.
  4. Oct 21, 2014 #4

    richmke

    richmke

    richmke

    Member

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2013
    Messages:
    1,796
    Likes Received:
    546
    Get a $20 bottle of wine of the same varietal you have made. Enjoy the wine, and fill the bottle with your kit wine. Serve your friends the wine (don't tell them it is your kit wine) and see what they say about it.
     
  5. Oct 21, 2014 #5

    Boatboy24

    Boatboy24

    Boatboy24

    No longer a newbie, but still clueless.

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2012
    Messages:
    11,895
    Likes Received:
    7,059
    Have any of these friends ever served brownies, cakes or cookies from a mix that came in a box? Did they like them? Do they make their own fresh pasta from scratch, or do they empty the box into boiling water? Just curious. :D
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2014
  6. Oct 22, 2014 #6

    zalai

    zalai

    zalai

    Member

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2013
    Messages:
    194
    Likes Received:
    75
    I copied this from a LHBS newsletter .
    ECLIPSE: THE BEST WINE YOU CAN MAKE AT HOME

    The Winexpert Eclipse project was three years in the making with the ultimate goal of producing the best wine kit ever. Simply put – Eclipse is for those who want to make the highest quality wine possible.

    Each style is double-blind tested by the Andrew Peller Ltd. professional tasting panel and must meet or exceed commercial wine in the $30 - $45 price range before being released. Eclipse offers the best of both worlds: it's good at 3 months of aging, but also holds generous rewards for those who age it much longer. Choose from 11 styles.

    Keep in mind that $ is Canadian dollar .:mny
     
  7. Oct 22, 2014 #7

    bkisel

    bkisel

    bkisel

    Junior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2013
    Messages:
    3,621
    Likes Received:
    1,701
    I can say YES for "medium" end (~$20.00 US) wine. I've never bought a high end bottle of wine so just can't say from my experience. Even the low end kits for me have turned out wines that I'd be willing to pay $10.00-$12.00 US for a 750ML bottle.
     
    LoneStarLori likes this.
  8. Oct 22, 2014 #8

    Floandgary

    Floandgary

    Floandgary

    Bottle at a time

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2012
    Messages:
    910
    Likes Received:
    322
    Unless ALL of your "friends" hold Sommelier credentials,,,,, just saying! You are in the hobby for YOU! Practice, practice, practice. You'll be surprised what you learn and what you can do in winemaking. Just look at the number of members here as well as the thousands of Q&A's
     
    bkisel likes this.
  9. Oct 22, 2014 #9

    buffalofrenchy

    buffalofrenchy

    buffalofrenchy

    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2014
    Messages:
    155
    Likes Received:
    36
    I make both wine and beer and it is interesting how people have very different views on these.
    I do feel people people look down on home winemakers but on the other hand tell someone you make your own beer and they look at you like a hero... Everyone agree that a home brew (beer) is much better than a commercial beer.
     
  10. Oct 22, 2014 #10

    sgift

    sgift

    sgift

    Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2014
    Messages:
    92
    Likes Received:
    18
    That's very interesting......
     
  11. Oct 23, 2014 #11

    terroirdejeroir

    terroirdejeroir

    terroirdejeroir

    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2012
    Messages:
    310
    Likes Received:
    62
    I have done something similar with friends and family, but do it more like a blind taste test with a mix of commercial and kit wines. Folks pretty reliably pick the WE Eclipse Lodi Ranch 11 Cab Sauv over $20-25 bottles of commercial Cab. Of course, it needs to be aged a year plus before you do the comparison...

    If you are interested in comparing to commercial wines, and you are making dry reds, I would recommend leaving out the sorbate as long as you are sure you have fermented to dryness. I personally think sorbate is, what's the technical term - icky!
     
    Boatboy24 likes this.
  12. Oct 25, 2014 #12

    sgift

    sgift

    sgift

    Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2014
    Messages:
    92
    Likes Received:
    18
    So buffalofrenchy, does that say commercial wine making is generally better then commercial beer making or does it speak to the type of people who drink wine vs beer? I have observed the same thing you have and have tried some great and awful home brew and even craft beer. I also don't care about the snobs and love the craft of making wine! Just wondering about these perceptions and why they are held. I am still a newbie but I really don't care what uninformed people think if I am learning and growing in skill and quality. Frankly the verdict is out on quality as none of my wine has aged enough to really tell. I am greatly enjoying the making, learning allot and appreciating all wine more thru the experience. I guess that's the point.....makers vs non makers? Point in case, no more sorbate in my dry red wines.
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2014
  13. Oct 27, 2014 #13

    Boatboy24

    Boatboy24

    Boatboy24

    No longer a newbie, but still clueless.

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2012
    Messages:
    11,895
    Likes Received:
    7,059
    We had a birthday party yesterday for my 7 year old. Almost 25 kids and at least as many adults. While there were a lot of juice boxes consumed, we also had plenty of beer and wine. I wasn't sure what to put out wine-wise and decided that a Merlot would be pleasing enough to red wine drinkers. Trouble is, the only Merlot I have bottled is almost gone and was one of my early efforts. I didn't want to serve it. So I bought a few bottles of Merlot to put out. Same struggle with white wine, and I decided that a blend would be a good all around choice (I have no white blends, so went commercial again). Pretty much all the adults knew I make wine and about half of them had sampled my work. Those that hadn't tried it wanted to, and those that had were disappointed to see commercial wines out. When the first few bottles were emptied, I went down to the cellar and brought up some of mine - A Red Mountain Cab, Super Tuscan, Aussie Chard and a Red blend. A little while later, I had stopped and asked one of my neighbors if she had a chance to refill with the Cabernet. She said "yes, and its really good, but I was hoping to try some of the stuff you made". :D That brought out a couple others who didn't realize they were drinking my homemade wine - all good reviews. And when the people who have tried my wine before figured out I had brought out the homemade stuff, they finished their beers and switched to wine. :D

    The point of my long-winded response is that, yes, you can make very good wine at home with kits. I have done a few now that I'd put up against $20 commercial wines. And while I'm my biggest critic and think I still have much to learn and improve on, the response seems to be very positive from people. With the exception of my first few batches, just about everything I've made would be at least as good as a $12 bottle from the store. Many I'd say are $15+. And as I said before, I have a few (maybe a handful) that I'd put up against $20 bottles. They need time to get to that point, but they get there.
     
    sour_grapes and cmason1957 like this.

Share This Page