Can i steal my neighbors overgrowth?

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Ajmassa

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My next door neighbor has a grape vine for red wine grapes growing wild and it has recently grown into my yard. When I noticed a couple months back I sorta convinced it to continue growing up my fence. Surprised to see just how quick this sucker grows.

This might be a stupid question- But is there any way i’m able to cut and replant this section and end up with my own vine based off what’s already growing on my side? Or do i need one of the main rooted sections? I am pretty sure it’s a long ways to the mother root from what’s in my yard.

*Should mention that I have no desire to make any wine from the vine. But i do think it would be nice to grow and train it and if that goes well then perhaps eventually planting a few of my own and building a nice looking little trellis or something. idk. Always thought it would be cool decor to have some grapes growing considering I’m such a winemaking nerd.
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Rembee

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You can try to air layer it using a simple plastic water bottle with the bottom cut off and the bottle cut long ways from the cap to the bottom. Then open it up and slide the bottle around the main vine with the bottom facing up. Fill the bottle with a mixture of half potting soil and sand mixed together. Then tape up the open seam. You can pack both ends with sphagnum peat moss to help contain the sand/soil mixture. Then keep it watered (damp). Do not over water it. Once you can see roots along the sides of the bottle you can then cut it free from the main vine, remove the bottle and plant your new vine. This normally takes from 8 to 10 weeks for me. I normally preform an air layer in July through August and plant the new vine in October. I air layer side vines that grow off of the main trunk.
 
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Jim Welch

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I wouldn’t call it stealing, depending on your state’s law you may have the right to cut any growth that grows over the property line onto your property. In my state that is the law I know. Not sure if you can grow a grape vine from a cutting though. You could try with some rooting hormone.
 

Jim Welch

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Coincidentally there is another post here talking about cuttings.


 

Rice_Guy

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If it has roots it will live. Picture number two looks like it is on the soil surface,, not in ground. The approach with highest success is to bury several nodes (18 inches/ a foot) in the soil and water daily to encourage rooting, leave the vine attached to the mother plant so it continues to get nutrition for the rest of the growing season. clipping actually is optional, the risk is as long as connected to the mother plant the neighbor could pull it out/ weed it/ poison it, from his side of the fence.
I like @Rembee air layering because it gives you some control over relocating the plant. Air layering is a harder technique and works better when spring time growth is happening. Good luck gardening.
 

Ajmassa

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I wouldn’t call it stealing, depending on your state’s law you may have the right to cut any growth that grows over the property line onto your property. In my state that is the law I know. Not sure if you can grow a grape vine from a cutting though. You could try with some rooting hormone.
lol. yeah didn’t mean that literally or legally. Just questioning if it was realistically able to be done. and thank you fir the thread link. it’s exactly what i needed.

You can try to air layer it using a simple plastic water bottle with the bottom cut off and the bottle cut long ways from the cap to the bottom. Then open it up and slide the bottle around the main vine with the bottom facing up. Fill the bottle with a mixture of half potting soil and sand mixed together. Then tape up the open seam. You can pack both ends with sphagnum peat moss to help contain the sand/soil mixture. Then keep it watered (damp). Do not over water it. Once you can see roots along the sides of the bottle you can then cut it free from the main vine, remove the bottle and plant your new vine. This normally takes from 8 to 10 weeks for me. I normally preform an air layer in July through August and plant the new vine in October. I air layer side vines that grow off of the main trunk.
this is perfect and exactly the type of thing i was curious about. you make it sound so easy tho! when the time comes i’ll have to really dig in and figure out the best approach. thank you

If it has roots it will live. Picture number two looks like it is on the soil surface,, not in ground. The approach with highest success is to bury several nodes (18 inches/ a foot) in the soil and water daily to encourage rooting, leave the vine attached to the mother plant so it continues to get nutrition for the rest of the growing season. clipping actually is optional, the risk is as long as connected to the mother plant the neighbor could pull it out/ weed it/ poison it, from his side of the fence.
I like @Rembee air layering because it gives you some control over relocating the plant. Air layering is a harder technique and works better when spring time growth is happening. Good luck gardening.
correct. nothing on my property is rooted. their vine is likely just one or 2 growing wild for a few years. and yes there is concern my neighbor will clean up that corner and kill my redirected vine. so i guess if that does happen i’ll be running to the shop and grabbing all necessary supplies for an emergency cutting replanting earlier than expected. otherwise i have a few options it seems. will be reading further into this over the next few weeks to get a game plan together.
worst case scenario? i just get some new vines and plant myself. but this existing vine just seems like a fun challenge to take on right now regardless ya know?
thanks for the input everyone.
 

Rice_Guy

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. worst case scenario? i just get some new vines and
curious, ,,,, you ever press any grapes ? worst case scenario is that you use some press cake for compost in the flower bed/ garden and each of the berries has three seeds in it and they each germinate and grow two years, and then folks can’t see your house and fence and yard and you even get lost driving by the grape vine place where you thought you lived in that area, , but you can’t find any house any more, and you wind up in a homeless shelter, but they see you still have some seeds on the cuff of your pants, so they kick you out for having seeds, so you really wind up on the street under a bridge, and some seeds fall out of your pants cuffs and they grow, so two years later the bridge is covered in grapes and a semi carrying fertilizer goes over the bridge, and loses its load, and the fertilizer spills on the grape vines and then the whole town just disappears.

yes sir the worst case isn’t pretty :oops:
 

Ajmassa

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curious, ,,,, you ever press any grapes ? worst case scenario is that you use some press cake for compost in the flower bed/ garden and each of the berries has three seeds in it and they each germinate and grow two years, and then folks can’t see your house and fence and yard and you even get lost driving by the grape vine place where you thought you lived in that area, , but you can’t find any house any more, and you wind up in a homeless shelter, but they see you still have some seeds on the cuff of your pants, so they kick you out for having seeds, so you really wind up on the street under a bridge, and some seeds fall out of your pants cuffs and they grow, so two years later the bridge is covered in grapes and a semi carrying fertilizer goes over the bridge, and loses its load, and the fertilizer spills on the grape vines and then the whole town just disappears.

yes sir the worst case isn’t pretty :oops:
well then hope this neighborly vine isn’t just a gateway vine. will try to avoid some press cake this fall might which could put me smack dab into the downward spiral of the throes of vine growing. maybe the fam will give an intervention before i’m a lost cause. thanks for the heads up bud ;)
 

Snafflebit

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curious, ,,,, you ever press any grapes ? worst case scenario is that you use some press cake for compost in the flower bed/ garden and each of the berries has three seeds in it and they each germinate and grow two years, and then folks can’t see your house and fence and yard and you even get lost driving by the grape vine place where you thought you lived in that area, , but you can’t find any house any more, and you wind up in a homeless shelter, but they see you still have some seeds on the cuff of your pants, so they kick you out for having seeds, so you really wind up on the street under a bridge, and some seeds fall out of your pants cuffs and they grow, so two years later the bridge is covered in grapes and a semi carrying fertilizer goes over the bridge, and loses its load, and the fertilizer spills on the grape vines and then the whole town just disappears.

yes sir the worst case isn’t pretty :oops:
I saw that movie!
JUMBOAUDREY2.jpg
 

franc1969

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If you know the variety, or at least whether it's a hybrid, American or grafted vinifera, could be very easy. Grafted vinifera- don't bother with rooting it, who wants to deal with phylloxera. Hybrid or American, just layer what comes over. Serpentine layering is easy, as long as that vine is. Run a row of pots filled with soil, pin down some nodes into them and go. You might try wounding and hormone to make sure, depends on variety.
If you only want leafy cover for a trellis, get rootstock from DoubleAA. I'd love the extra fruit- it's worth a try for something decorative and a gallon or two a year.
 

NorCal

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One year I took the cuttings from a winter pruning of Cab Franc, put a node or two below the surface in a wine barrel with potting soil and two or three nodes above the surface. Pretty much forgot about them. I’d say 85% survived and were then replanted elsewhere. As others said, it’s not on rootstock, so you have disease susceptibility, but it’s a weed and is pretty hardy.
 

Ajmassa

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That looks dead easy to root down, right where it is. It already has a trunk, and fruit!
You actually think so?
That video in post #12 that @David Violante posted looked kinda cool. Was thinking about doing something like that — basically the same as the water bottle method that others mentioned. Was just a little unsure about the ideal location to draw roots. Or if the method of stripping the outside layer & wrapping would even work on a grape vine.
 

franc1969

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I have had much better yield layering plants vs. cuttings. Grapes I unintentionally layered and got new plants, they don't need much encouragement to root. That rootmaker ball that david linked is great, but you can do about the same with prepped plastic food tubs. As long as your neighbor isn't going to spray or cut the vine before you have roots. I have not done this while vine was fruiting, so I don't know what slowdown you'll get. I'd cut off most fruit if your focus is rooting new plants.
If you like where the vine is, dead easy, and you can keep a large portion of the vine intact and already have a trunk to figure out a pruning system. Dig below vine where the bottom of its trunk would be, and bury that part. I'd bury deeper, if you want to keep a trunk. If you want multiple plants to move elsewhere - try serpentine layering. Google pictures, but it's basically zigzagging in and out of soil/pots. Use a landscape staple to pin the vine down. Wound the vine a bit where buried. You can use rooting hormone, but grapes don't really need that. Cutting all the way around is more for trees, not vines.
In fall or winter, cut the vines apart and you have new plants already in pots. I'd dig a bit around the trunk if you keep that- make sure you have enough roots established before you cut off the mother vine.
 

David Violante

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I like the idea of @franc1969 in establishing a root below where it is if that’s where you will want a main vine. I also like the idea of using what you may already have. Those root balls looked pretty cool and showed a good proof of concept for layering ideas, but I like the several pot or buried in soil idea too. Those vines look great! ...and so it begins!
 

Khristyjeff

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curious, ,,,, you ever press any grapes ? worst case scenario is that you use some press cake for compost in the flower bed/ garden and each of the berries has three seeds in it and they each germinate and grow two years, and then folks can’t see your house and fence and yard and you even get lost driving by the grape vine place where you thought you lived in that area, , but you can’t find any house any more, and you wind up in a homeless shelter, but they see you still have some seeds on the cuff of your pants, so they kick you out for having seeds, so you really wind up on the street under a bridge, and some seeds fall out of your pants cuffs and they grow, so two years later the bridge is covered in grapes and a semi carrying fertilizer goes over the bridge, and loses its load, and the fertilizer spills on the grape vines and then the whole town just disappears.

yes sir the worst case isn’t pretty :oops:
I like the way you think! Weird. :)
 

Rice_Guy

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layering in natural soil on a normal year will do better for uniform available moisture, ( this area has drought so irrigation drippers would help this year.)
I have had much better yield layering plants vs. cuttings. Grapes I unintentionally layered and got new plants, they don't need much encouragement to root. . . . As long as your neighbor isn't going to spray or cut the vine before you have roots. I have not done this while vine was fruiting, so I don't know what slowdown you'll get. I'd cut off most fruit if your focus is rooting new plants. . . - make sure you have enough roots established before you cut off the mother vine.
yes balance the root vs leaf. ,,, this said I am the church mow person and trying to kill rooted wild grape on a hill by snipping every few feet last month and repeated mowing over summer. The established roots are winning so far, putting up new leaf material every week.
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Ajmassa

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Absolutely love seeing these grapes coming in and see a season’s progression 1st hand. I don’t have much of a green thumb but I always did enjoy the process and all the tlc needed — to where you become emotionally invested.
Years ago I used to grow a plant or 2 a year. The type that had to be in the backyard away from neighbors 👀. Those plants had the same timeline as a grapevine, harvesting in early fall.
For me it was never about the harvest, but more the process of guiding it along. Kinda like winemaking—the journey can be more enjoyable than the destination.

Anyway, question. There are super long sections growing that do not have any fruit. Mostly all fruit is towards the center. (The fruit to the left is coming from opposite side i directed to the fence). Would cutting those fruitless sections off encourage better fruit development?

. I have not done this while vine was fruiting, so I don't know what slowdown you'll get. I'd cut off most fruit if your focus is rooting new plants.
If you like where the vine is, dead easy, and you can keep a large portion of the vine intact and already have a trunk to figure out a pruning system. Dig below vine where the bottom of its trunk would be, and bury that part. I'd bury deeper, if you want to keep a trunk
Wound the vine a bit where buried. You can use rooting hormone, but grapes don't really need that. Cutting all the way around is more for trees, not vines.
In fall or winter, cut the vines apart and you have new plants already in pots. I'd dig a bit around the trunk if you keep that- make sure you have enough roots established before you cut off the mother vine.
I don’t care about the fruit on the main vine running up the fence. I’d like to root it down right where it is like you said.
But I am confused by your comment. how can I establish new roots in the ground before cutting from mother vine? Or even know they’re there if buried?
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