Calculating "residual sugar content"?

Discussion in 'Beginners Wine Making Forum' started by M38A1, Sep 10, 2019 at 8:20 PM.

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  1. Sep 10, 2019 at 8:20 PM #1

    M38A1

    M38A1

    M38A1

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    I visited a local winery this past weekend and spoke with the owner about their peach wines. He was willing to talk to me/confirm some things (held his yeast variety close to the vest) and talk about his sweetness benchmark. He referred to "...a residual sugar content of 6% is where he finishes".

    I can wrap my head around Specific Gravity (SG) as sugar content before/during/after, but I don't know how to make a SG conversion to a percentage. For example, I know I run all my 6gal Dragons Blood batches down to dry at .990 from a starting SG of about 1.075, then bring sugar back in via simple syrup at 1cup/gallon. I think that puts me in the 1.010-1.015 range if I recall correctly.

    So how does one calculate SG as a percentage of residual sugar?

    ...go easy please - my head hurts with all this stuff. :)
     
  2. Sep 10, 2019 at 10:57 PM #2

    Scooter68

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    I gotcha on that number process. I just go to the flavor I like and stop a hair short. With peach it's bringing back the flavor that I go for. I don't have to have it sweet but the flavor and OH that aroma of a fresh glass of pure peach wine is intoxicating before the first sip even hits the palate.

    BUT check these Three pages out. One talks about how a dry vs off- dry vs sweet wine compare in terms of grams/liter
    then there is longer description and finally a calculator to help do the math.
    If I understand the process correctly - You should be able to get to a 6% number by understanding that 0.2% residual sugar contains two grams of sugar in a liter of wine. So 6% / .2 = 30 or 3 grams per liter which the calcultor says is an SG of 1.012 (rounded up)

    Chart - https://www.winecurmudgeon.com/residual-sugar-in-wine-with-charts-and-graphs/

    Discussion - https://winemakermag.com/technique/501-measuring-residual-sugar-techniques

    Calculator - http://www.musther.net/vinocalc.html#sgconversion

    Hey and thanks for asking that question. I had never really addressed the categorization of wine with real hard numbers. I learned something by doing a little research.

    Of course someone with a whole lot more experience will probably correct me and give you a better shortcut. (Hey I'm still learning)
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2019 at 11:07 PM
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  3. Sep 10, 2019 at 11:22 PM #3

    stickman

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    6% sugar is quite a lot, it's actually 60g/liter.
     
  4. Sep 11, 2019 at 4:10 AM #4

    sour_grapes

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    You can use Fermcalc to calculate how many g/l it would take to raise your SG from, say, 0.990 to 1.010. I think it takes something like 20 g/l to raise the SG by 0.010 points (but you can check my # on Fermcalc). So, it would take something like 40 g/l (AKA, 4% residual sugar) to raise your wine from 0.990 to 1.010.
     
  5. Sep 11, 2019 at 4:09 PM #5

    M38A1

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    Thx for the info.....
     

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