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Bulk bottle storage for aging

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wxtrendsguy

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Technical spec info direct from the manufacturer says the cages can be stacked 4 high fully loaded and will be stable. The top half of the front gate can be opened and structural integrity will be maintained...
 

sour_grapes

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For space purposes I wouldn't consider stacking on top and side by side. Mine are squares turned 45* the stacking is similar but somehow the 60* thing seems to work more efficiently.
Fred, I hope you realize that this is exactly how you are stacking them. Just turned 45 degrees:

45 deg bottles.jpg
 

wxtrendsguy

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So an update....we are stacking them 2 high with no issues... we also find that stacking bottles left to right in the bin is the best way, can get about 710 bottles per cage. Yes if you stack them front to back you can get closer to 800 however you cannot use the front gate as the roll out and when they are stacked you need to be able to open the gate to reach inside to retrieve a bottle from the lower crate. The only headaches I get are with hock bottles. They just do not stack nicely...so we stand em up and then a layer of cardboard and another layer, cardboard and then another layer. Can only get about 630 bottles when done this way but its best for the hocks.
 

Emann Agius

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Hi. I recently started working in a professional winery and I need to a tackle an issue that I found. I have a big number of old bottles of wine vintage 2005. I did a sample testing and the wine is still good although is has a slight hint of oxidation on the nose but when i comes to taste its still good. The problem is that it is full of sediment which makes it difficuilt If i put it on the market. Is it possible to open, put in a tank and rebottle? What is the approach i should take?
 

sour_grapes

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Hi. I recently started working in a professional winery and I need to a tackle an issue that I found. I have a big number of old bottles of wine vintage 2005. I did a sample testing and the wine is still good although is has a slight hint of oxidation on the nose but when i comes to taste its still good. The problem is that it is full of sediment which makes it difficuilt If i put it on the market. Is it possible to open, put in a tank and rebottle? What is the approach i should take?
How many bottles are we talking about? Yes, it is certainly possible to open the bottles, tank, and rebottle. It may not be profitable from a time/money standpoint, though.

A few years ago I found a pretty nice wine, from an older vintage, for small money at a few local stores. The bottles were chock full of wine diamonds. I inferred (rightly or wrongly) that they bottled too soon, the wine dropped tartrates, the populace was not amused, and the wine sat on shelves as a result. I guessed that eventually, they solved their problem with a fire sale. I bought a bunch, and decanted the bottles as I went.

In your case, I am a bit concerned about your comment about oxidation. How bad is it?
 

FunkedOut

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If you could put 800 bottles in a bin, according to my math at 3 lbs per bottle it would only be 2400 lbs. Almost half of the capacity, feeling a little better about it.
I’m actually building a storage rack for a modest ~200 bottles.
It’s actually two ~100 bottle towers joined.
These towers use 60* triangles rather than diamonds.
I’ll get some pictures up as I go.

I weighed a few store bought bottle and some are as heavy as 7lbs!
That would put the weight over the recommended max for these bins.
You might want to check the weight of your bottles.
That’s a lot of money invested and the time to clean it up would suck too.
 

Rice_Guy

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The problem is that it is full of sediment which makes it difficuilt If i put it on the market. . . What is the approach i should take?
The sediment is a marketing issue. My kid in DC will pay extra for Italian imports with wine crystals.
“Traditional”, , “No added chemicals”, , “Natural”, , “Unfiltered”, , “Unpasteurized “, , etc
 

bshef

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Hi. I recently started working in a professional winery and I need to a tackle an issue that I found. I have a big number of old bottles of wine vintage 2005. I did a sample testing and the wine is still good although is has a slight hint of oxidation on the nose but when i comes to taste its still good. The problem is that it is full of sediment which makes it difficuilt If i put it on the market. Is it possible to open, put in a tank and rebottle? What is the approach i should take?
How about using the wine for a port style or sherry? Both are oxidized, aged wines. I think that would be better than trying to rebottling as is.
 

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