Brit humor on Thanksgiving...

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Rocky

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This is not a joke and it actually happened. It demonstrates the British humor which I thoroughly enjoy.

It was just before the Thanksgiving Day break at work in 1995 and we had a number of British colleagues in the States who worked for our company in England. They were returning to England the next day so a group of we Americans and British stopped at a local watering hole to have a few and the conversation got around to the holiday.
One of my American friends asked, "How do you guys celebrate Thanksgiving in England?"
Whereupon another American chastised, "You Dummy! They don't celebrate Thanksgiving in England! That is an American holiday."
At this point, one of the Brits said, "No, actually we do celebrate Thanksgiving, but we do it on the 4th of July."
 

DizzyIzzy

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Now that made me laugh - and I say that as an expat Scot. The "English" are very strange.. Now , the Scots are a very different kettle of fish
Being from the MacDonald clan, should I consider that a compliment?...................................................DizzyIzzy
 

DarrenUK

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I have family that live in naples florida.
When I was out there last we all went to a bar with a bunch of my cousins friends. There was some other fellow brits in the bar but I didn't know that at the time until one of my cousins friends asked " have you seen the Queen?"
I responded " yeah but there not the same since Freddie Mercury died". The only other two people that laughed where in another group that overheard. They turned out to be brits like my self. The funny bit was the confusion on his face more than anything else but in truth American humour isn't that far different from anywhere else... We all just like digging at each other.
 

BernardSmith

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I gotta disagree. British humor tends to be far more rough, tough and in your face and is far more politically sharp than US humor. Compare Steptoe and Son, "til death us do part, and the original (the British version ) of The Office. Sure jokes are jokes the world over but HUMOR is different. :tz
 

DarrenUK

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I gotta disagree. British humor tends to be far more rough, tough and in your face and is far more politically sharp than US humor. Compare Steptoe and Son, "til death us do part, and the original (the British version ) of The Office. Sure jokes are jokes the world over but HUMOR is different. :tz
Maybe.... I mean we have had some dumb down stuff here too. Little Britain was garbage but massively popular.
American comidians like Joe Rogan or Bill Burr are really sharp.
Although I would agree that there was a time that witt was very much a "this side of the pond" thing.

Or Maybe it's just me... I travel alot and have family all over the world and married to a German. So maybe I'm not a good example of British lol
 
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BernardSmith

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I've been living in the states for about 30 years and when I visit my daughter who lives in Wales and we watch Brit TV the humor is often (not always - because just as you say, there is a great deal of garbage ) sharp and witty and very class conscious in a way that US humor (on TV) is not. Stand-up, is very different, but the analogy I would use is that of FM radio. Music that is played on FM for the most part is unoriginal garbage. Indie music which is so rarely played can be fantastic. And stand-up in the US is equivalent to indie music.
 
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So I'll jump in. I was stationed at RAF Chicksands in the USAF in the 1980's. It was near Shefford. Our Chaplain arranged for a traditional Thanksgiving meal at a local restaurant. As pumpkin pie is rarely heard of in England (at least in 1985) he gave them a recipe. The whole meal was quite lovely and the time for dessert had arrived. The Chef brought out the pumpkin pie and everyone was amazed. Amazed not that the pie was well done but the baker had missed the part of the recipe where one purees the pumpkin. Think of apple pie but chunks of pumpkin instead. Well, amazed and surprised is probably a better way of reporting it. Cheers!
 

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