Bottling time question

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SMT

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Hi folks, thanks to many responses and advice from the forum, I'm in the process of bottling my second batch of wine (first was a Napa Cab Sauv , this one is the Lodi Zin made with skins). I racked both to small barrels (reserve) and bottled the rest - very happy with the process and experimenting with spirals and oak cubes etc..

I'll post pictures of the full process soon.

In the meantime, the corks I purchased seem too long. About half an inch sticks up out of the bottles. Is it ok to slice them? Daft question , but I'm concerned to affects the aeration and spoils the wine.

many thanks
Steve
 

NorCal

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The corks should be fully seated. Do you have a picture to share? How did you insert the corks? To answer your question though, you will receive less protection of the wine, the smaller the cork. If you are going to consume within the year, shouldn't be an issue, assuming the cork that was inserted is providing a proper seal.
 

SMT

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I sanitize, rinse the cork - sliced a thin layer then inserted into the bottle with the sliced end facing up. I then covered with wax or PVC heat shrink capsules before storage.

Would a thin slice of the cork really affect it - I didn't know they were sealed.
 

SMT

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happy to be a foolish man at this stage ;). well, when I used the corking contraption (don't know what its called) - about an inch of the cork stuck up from the top of the bottle . Either they were too long or I didn't do it properly (I didn't have this issue with my cab Sauvignon).

Anyway and regardless, is it an issue if I sliced a fraction from the cork - the open end was facing up and not into the wine for storage. Also, protected with wax or PVC capsule.

If there is a risk of mold or oxidation I'll remove all and re -cork.

I'm sure the romans didn't have these issues :)
 

WinoDon

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I had this problem with a floor corker and after many adjustments that did not resolve the issue I chucked it and bought a new one ....problem solved . The wine store guy said they can't be fixed satisfactorily and it's best to replace it
 

Rice_Guy

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* ALL natural cork leaks oxygen, (4 to 8 mg per yr)
* synthetic Nomacorc are manufactured in several grades (reserva, 100; 300; 500) which are manufactured to give a range of oxygen transmission which can copy natural and be significantly tighter. (0.6 to 4 mg per yr) with the reserva rated as 25 year storage corks
* To have a tight closure you would want a aluminum cap with a plastic seal about 0.1 mg per yr
In the meantime,. Is it ok to slice them? , , but I'm concerned to affects the aeration and spoils the wine.
in the scheme of things the length is relative, industry folks know they leak but they look good so more expensive wines use them as a marketing gimmick, and kinda a waste of a natural product to trim them
 

Cap Puncher

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One thing you could try is to push them in with a chapstick plastic tube. You need to be on the floor with the bottle between you legs. Apply your body weight while carefully lining up the chapstick with your hands. Be careful if you try it ( it could hurt if you slip). I have done this for bottles with a 1/4 in over the top ( never 1 in). The 1 in might be too much for the above method, but you could give it a try.
 
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when I used the corking contraption (don't know what its called)
Post a picture so we'll know what we're advising you on.

If the corks are not seating properly, the corker is not adjusted correctly. My Italian floor corker is fully adjustable, as is my ancient double-lever corker. Both have a nut that adjusts the height.

If the corker is not adjustable, I don't know if there is a choice other than to get a better one. And to post negative reviews regarding corkers that cannot be adjusted.

IMG_20210503_105432600.jpg

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If the corker cannot be adjusted, get one that can be.
 

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