Blending types of wine

Discussion in 'Kit Winemaking' started by Eyota_Standing_Bear, Apr 15, 2019.

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  1. Apr 15, 2019 #1

    Eyota_Standing_Bear

    Eyota_Standing_Bear

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    Is it okay to blend, like a Merlot with Malbec without risks ?

    I want to make that personal blend because there are no wine kit that exist.

    Do I have to blend both of juice bases at the beginning in primary fermenter or I can mix them in the second stage (carboy) ?

    Anyone ever tried that ?
     
  2. Apr 15, 2019 #2

    cmason1957

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    Not only is it perfectly safe to blend Merlot with Malbec, it is a great thing to do.

    There are two ways to go about blending:
    1) Field Blend, this is where you blend it at the beginning in your primary fermenter, pros, really easy to do, cons, you get what you get and you don't know what that will taste like. Happens all the time and can make some really good wines, but you won't repeat what you had next year.

    2) Make the wines independantly. So you leave the wines as if you were making a Merlot and a Malbec and then at some future date you do bench trials, where you do a 50/50 blend and maybe a 25%merlot/75% malbec and a 75%Merlot/25%malbec, You decide what works best and can replicate what you did by taste, year over year.

    I have done it both ways and can't say I prefer one way over the other.

    One thing to keep in mind, if you go way 2, both wines should either be put through MLF or Not. and since you are talking red wines, they probably should go through MLF, unless these are kit wines.
     
  3. Apr 15, 2019 #3

    salcoco

    salcoco

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    way two above is the best. if blended properly you can have three wine when finished two original and one blended.
     
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  4. Apr 15, 2019 #4

    Eyota_Standing_Bear

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    Hmm yeah, I prefer the second way, that way I can blend 'till it's perfect. Nice idea
    Best ratio for both ? error and trial ?
     
  5. Apr 15, 2019 #5

    skyfire322

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    +1 on idea number two. There really isn't a set ratio you'd need to adhere to. Just take 'em to the test bench, blend different ratios in test tubes and taste each until you find the one or two you like! :)
     
  6. Apr 15, 2019 #6

    Eyota_Standing_Bear

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    Thank you all for the advices :)
     
  7. Apr 16, 2019 #7

    salcoco

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    be aware once you have chosen a blend, makeup a batch say one bottle . let it set for a couple of weeks. there are times that additional sediment may develop once a blend is established. this short time with the blend should be adequate to surface this and any other maladies, before completing final batch and bottling.
     
  8. Apr 17, 2019 #8

    tradowsk

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    I also would suggest the second approach. I haven't done too much blending, but whatever blend ratio you decide on, I would make a single bottle of that and let it sit for a few weeks before tasting again. Blending wines, especially young wines, the flavors can change drastically as they settle down and age. So I would say letting the blend age for a bit allows you to make sure you will like the final results.
     
  9. Apr 19, 2019 #9

    Sailor323

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    I enjoy a good rosé and would be interested in whether any of you have suggestions for blends that would result in rosé
     
  10. Apr 29, 2019 #10

    kuziwk

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    You can do it but it wouldn't be a proper rose. A rose is supposed to have the original skins in contact with the must for a short period of time for a bit of flavor and color, so not a red or a white. @Eyota_Standing_Bear they do make blends, vineco has a few.
     
  11. Apr 29, 2019 #11

    Sailor323

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    kuziwk, I agree, but there are not many rosé kits on the market. I've found 2, one very expensive (RJS Chillean Pinot Noir rosé) and the other (also RJS Cru International) not so expensive.
     
  12. Apr 29, 2019 #12

    kuziwk

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    Can you get vineco in your area? They have an excellent Rose for $130 Cad, goes really well with pork ribs.
     
  13. Apr 29, 2019 #13

    mainshipfred

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    Not Rose's but when I blend I'll wait at least a month before bottling, more often longer. IMO it takes that long for everything to meld together. I guess the argument could be made it could do the same thing in the bottle.
     

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