Best Winemaking Books - Professional Grade

Discussion in 'Tutorials, Calculators, Wine Logs & Yeast Charts' started by Musirio, Mar 30, 2015.

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  1. Mar 30, 2015 #1

    Musirio

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    Hey all!

    I'm sure there is a section somewhere in here dedicated to this, however, I was just looking for suggestions of great high-quality professional winemaking books.

    Shoot me some titles please!

    Dan
     
  2. Nov 1, 2018 #2

    SethF

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  3. Nov 1, 2018 #3

    CK55

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    Its okay but most of what he writes i could tell you. As i study french wines heavily and they are my favorite. So ive both spoken to french winemakers personally over the phone and whatnot and read everything i could get my hands on.

    But it is a decent book worth getting if you find it reasonably priced, meaning under $20
     
  4. Nov 2, 2018 #4

    sour_grapes

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    What in the heck is the point of this post, CK? Are you saying that Pambianchi's book is not all that valuable, because you (think that you) know most of what is in it? Because you have actually, you know, spoken on the phone with winemakers who are French, and you like French wines? :slp

    You say you have read widely. Perhaps, then, you could oblige the OP's simple request and tell him or her some better sources than Pambianchi, from your vast trove of experience.

    [Edited to soften!]
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2018
  5. Nov 2, 2018 #5

    Ajmassa5983

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    I’d like to purchase the CK hard cover edition.
    If I can get it for under $20.

    Until then I’ll stick with what I refer to as my wine bible. Not a book. But a 74 page pdf manual.
    Very detailed and has just about everything needed to make red wine from grapes. (Separate manual for whites)

    https://morewinemaking.com/web_files/intranet.morebeer.com/files/wredw.pdf
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2018
  6. Nov 2, 2018 #6

    CK55

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    Im saying its okay, he doesnt go that indepth in the stuff that actually matters hes kind of brief on a lot of subjects, But he does have a chart in the book thats really awesome for yeasts. I really liked it.
     
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  7. Nov 2, 2018 #7

    CDrew

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    @CK55-You are no doubt an enthusiastic dude. But you are a neophyte with no knowledge or education to back up your posts. If I'm wrong about this, post your credentials. I'll bet you skimmed Pambianchi's book if you read it at all. But it would be good for you to read it. Because it's actually quite good and quite detailed, especially in the laboratory sections. How much testing have you done? None? Have you even managed to make wine that you could drink? Your posts all come across as deeply opinionated, which is ok if you know, but not ok when you obviously don't. Just as a for instance, when previously forum members asked about yeast, you would always respond with something like "212 is the only yeast remotely acceptable to my discerning palate". Yet, from what you have posted all your wine has gone bad and has major H2S problems. The school of hard knocks is pretty tough. But post a picture of you, Pambianchi's book and the wine you've made for some credibility.



    And you've spoken to French winemakers. This is just so laughable. Really? Who? Do you speak French? Because for damn sure they are not speaking English on the phone to some dude in central California with 3 gallons of wine to their name. I've enjoyed French wines too. It doesn't mean I have the wine maker on speed dial. But I quoted your post because it's awesome in it's conceit. You study French wines heavily (but vaguely), and thus you are qualified to critique wine making books. Hmm. It doesn't work like that. But capital letters in appropriate places do work. You should try them.

    I could respect you if you if you came across with real knowledge or real experience, but instead you come across as a know-it-all and a braggart. I hope you're different in real life.

    My advice; grow up. It's ok to be at the start of a long journey. It's not ok to act like you are the voice of experience when you so obviously are not. It's not ok to make false claims, and it's not ok to give advice about things you know nothing about.
     
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  8. Nov 2, 2018 #8

    CK55

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    I did read the entire book, I skipped over the parts he briefly does about kit wines, which are in the book. I mostly bought it because he put chateau style wine on the cover and im like crazy about french wine. So Yeah it was mostly a impulse buy but it was and is useful.
     
  9. Nov 2, 2018 #9

    CK55

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    You are literally crazy if you think that i havent made wine i could drink, i only had one batch go wrong to date. That was due to overwhelming Hydrogen Sulfide that was too severe to treat. No amount of racking/aeration, Sulfites and or copper could treat it.

    I am a opinionated person, Mostly because i think its valid to be opinionated. But i do listen to things people say, But I also have my opinion about them.

    Well everyone would agree if you are making a red and dont know RC-212 is the go to choice. Mostly because it is way easier to manage than BM 4x4 which will kick out a lot of Hydrogen Sulfide without proper nutrient additions so its more demanding on people and if you arent experienced i would recommend waiting before using it. Or looking up recommendations and asking someone who has used it. AJ is pretty reliable when it comes to information i get a lot of advice from AJ.

    The only reason that batch went wrong was because i had never used the yeast before and just didnt pick up that it needed so much nutrients used my normal schedule which was not enough and didnt catch it in time.

    Ill add that I have friends in france, and you do realize that most people in europe are capable of comprehending and speaking english right since it is the largest language in the world. One of my favorite local Wineries Tablas Creek is associated with a very reputable french winery Chateau de Beaucastel and all the Vines they have are from cuttings from this french Winery, I have stopped by and spoken to the winemaker on 4 occasions. People are pretty helpful if you ask.
     
  10. Nov 2, 2018 #10

    sour_grapes

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    @CK55 , I am not piling on here. In the morning light, I am going to take a different, less adversarial tack.

    May I suggest to you that, in crafting your posts, that you keep your focus on helping the other person. Someone posted on here asking for information. You apparently have information to share. Keep the focus on helping that person, not on yourself. If you find yourself describing your sandy soil, the age of your vines, or your preferences in drinking wine, when these are not relevant to the person asking for information, then delete those parts of your post.

     
  11. Nov 2, 2018 #11

    CDrew

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    Is this some 21st century feel good mumbojumbo? Valid to regurgitate falsehoods to the point you get called out? Valid to lie on the forum, to falsely embellish your accomplishments? These are not the actions of an honorable man.

    "Everyone"? Who's that? In fact, most would not agree. They would agree it is one of many good and acceptable choices in red wine making. But you just can't stop making authoritative statements with no facts, education, or practical knowledge. There is a funny sticky on this forum somewhere where another "expert" lists 212 as the "best" yeast for every variety of red wine. But that ignores a whole world of interesting yeasts that all make excellent wine. Given your H2S problems, I could suggest you try Avante yeast. It has been genetically selected so it can't make H2S. Or, you could be more careful with your techniques.


    Alright, we agree on something. He at least doesn't brag or lie.

    So are you saying that because you have friends in France, and the local winery is owned by a French wine company, and brought cuttings from France, and you went there, that that makes the winemaker French? Or if he/she is French, and even though they are making California wine, you received a special French blessing from them? 4 times? Stop digging your hole deeper. And by the way, Chinese(Mandarin) is the most spoken language in the world. Spanish is #2 and English is #3.

    I am trying to help you too, and with introspection, see yourself the way you came across here. Rather than posting on the forum, spend the winter making wine from frozen must, 1 bucket at a time. Do some experiments, make some mistakes. Make some Chilean grapes into wine this spring. Learn something about yeasts, sterile procedure, aging. Hell, drink some wine. Get some practical experience and temper your statements. Practice and prepare yourself for next fall, but stop posting your "expertise" on the forum.
     
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  12. Nov 2, 2018 #12

    CK55

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    I mean I was thinking all night and looking at my book collection trying to find see decent recommemdations but yeah, pretty much the book he brought up initially is the next starting point most of my others are about actually growing and maintaining grapevines
     
  13. Nov 2, 2018 #13

    CK55

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    Yep, we can agree on that, I have never told a lie in my life, brag sure but who doesn't. And you seem to misinterpret literally everything. Therefore I'm just going to ignore you and get back to posting.
     
  14. Nov 2, 2018 #14

    Newine

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    Winery Technology & Operations
    A Handbook for Small Wineries
    By Dr. Yair Margalit
    The Wine Appreciation Guild
    San Francisco

    Pretty technical but also quite readable.

    Much more basic but a solid starting point would be.

    From Vines to Wines by Jeff Cox

    Neither will tell you which yeast you should use
    I think you have to research that based on what you're starting with and what your trying to make from it. My vines are all hybrids living in the Midwest so I for instance I am working with yeasts that are supposed to consume malic acid for my reds as we have such high acid.

    Good luck, hope this does not start another dust up.:)
     
  15. Nov 2, 2018 #15

    CK55

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    From Vines to Wines is a good book, I do have it and it does have a pretty good amount of information on growing grapes but it doesnt include all the trellis styles just some of them. Which is the only thing i dont like that much.
     
  16. Nov 2, 2018 #16

    stickman

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    Much depends on what type of grapes you have available and what type wine you are trying to make.

    For me the classic French wine making book is Knowing and Making Wine by Emile Peynaud, a few topics are considered dated, but most are still valid today.

    If you're looking to blow your mind, then Post Modern Winemaking by Clark Smith is the book for you. This is not a step by step winemaking book, though it covers many winemaking topics in great detail, there is an assumption that you already know how to make wine, but be prepared to turn everything upside down.
     
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  17. Nov 4, 2018 #17

    winemaker81

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