Back sweetening with frozen concentrate?

Discussion in 'General Wine Making Forum' started by sledman765, Feb 15, 2014.

Wine Making Forum

Help Support Winemaking Talk by donating:

  1. Feb 15, 2014 #1

    sledman765

    sledman765

    sledman765

    Junior

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2013
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have 2 six gallon batches of fruit wine fermenting that I made from Welch's concentrate, white grape peach and white grape raspberry. I am thinking of back sweetening with the same concentrates to enhance the fruit flavor of each. My concern is that some of the fruit flavor will have been lost during fermentation and I really want each batch to have a noticeable fruit flavor. Any thoughts? Has anyone on here tried this before?


    Sent from my iPhone using Wine Making
     
  2. Feb 15, 2014 #2

    cintipam

    cintipam

    cintipam

    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2013
    Messages:
    801
    Likes Received:
    268
    I do this all the time. But since it also adds sugar I benchtest to make sure that it won't add too much sugar, keeping in mind that wine becomes sweeter over time. Since there is more volume in concentrates than in say those flavor bottles available at the local home brew shop, I have noticed a bit of drop in the wines ABV. to counteract that I have started raising the SG when I start wine so the later dilution for flavor still has an ABV within the safe to age range.

    I usually add a can to top off when transferring from fermenting bucket to first carboy. This raises ABV a bit more, plus keeps it burping a bit longer. I've been happy with my results using frozen concentrates, but also use those bottles from the store and Durkee vanilla. Do get some of the chocolate concentrate and try that also. I was amazed how fabulous that was, esp in reds.

    Pam in cinti
     
  3. Feb 15, 2014 #3

    cintipam

    cintipam

    cintipam

    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2013
    Messages:
    801
    Likes Received:
    268
    BTW if you want to increase specifically the peach or raspberry, you will need those concentrates from the home brew shop. Those flavors are so soft within the concentrate that just the concentrate alone will not kick it up a notch. I combine the two, and maybe vanilla or even another flavor concentrate. That's why benchtests are so fun. I get to sit outside with a lot of little cups and bottles and just try what each new flavor brings to the table. I didn't think I'd like the chocolate ext (not a big fan of choc, but hubby is so I bought it for him) but my oh my does that stuff add to the wine. Also, I had a bit of an offtaste in my Cranapple wine made all from concentrates and the vanilla covered that taste and made it my current favorite. It was one of my first large volume wines I made, so the ABV is a bit too low for longterm aging. Thus I enjoy it freely without worrying about putting away bottles for years from now.

    Pam in cinti
     
  4. Feb 15, 2014 #4

    sledman765

    sledman765

    sledman765

    Junior

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2013
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks Pam!

    I did start by adding sugar and brought the BRIX up to 17 which is a SG of about 1.67. What is the final SG that you are looking for when finishing? I'm curious because I've never made a fruit wine. Also, thanks for the tip on the chocolate concentrate. I didn't realize anything like that existed.

    Scott.


    Sent from my iPhone using Wine Making
     
  5. Feb 15, 2014 #5

    cintipam

    cintipam

    cintipam

    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2013
    Messages:
    801
    Likes Received:
    268
    I shoot for at least 1.100 when starting a must, sometimes even higher if I think the flavor is so delicate to need a lot of added flavor later. Generally for fruit wine they recommend 1.090 for reds, and a a bit less for whites. My preference for years has been tart white wine, but I'm finding that I really enjoy reds in fruit wine. For finishing, i ferment to dry (can be anywhere from 1.00 to .900 depending on the yeast) then flavorpak to whatever I think tastes best. By bench trial of course, nothing worse than adding too much sugar via the concentrate to the whole batch.

    Folks here at WMT taught me that light colored fruit takes a lot more to keep a flavor in the wine than darker colored fruit. That has held true so far in my experience.

    If your local brew house doesn't carry those flavor concentrates I'd suggest ordering over the web. They are a great way to pop the flavor. Sometimes some folks say a couple of the flavors can impart an artificial flavor, so benchtrials are a must to determine how much to add. Personally I have at least one container of every flavor I can find, more of cranberry which has become my base flavor of choice. I'm newish to this, so needed a way to learn without breaking the bank. Now I start with concentrates and add frozen fruit in fermenting bags. I have lots of fruit frozen from last season from my yard, and enjoy combining flavors.

    One more step I have NOT reached yet is to experience how my wines change over time in the bottle. They say it can deepen flavor, become richer etc. I have to admit I flavor my wines to the point where I like them, tho not quite as sweet, when I flavorpak them prior to aging for a while. If they become a lot more flavor intense years down the road I might have created a monster. Right now I'm enjoying wines made about 6 months back, and they are great. But I did want to let you know that my experience does not include what happens after long term aging.

    Hope this helps.

    Pam in cinti
     
  6. Feb 15, 2014 #6

    vacuumpumpman

    vacuumpumpman

    vacuumpumpman

    Vendor Sponsor

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2011
    Messages:
    3,958
    Likes Received:
    954
    I also will back sweeten at times using a frozen concentrate juice - it adds flavor and sugar - like others have mentioned - bench trials are always the best
     
  7. Feb 15, 2014 #7

    cintipam

    cintipam

    cintipam

    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2013
    Messages:
    801
    Likes Received:
    268
    Forgot to mention you need to be sure to use the correct yeast that will tolerate your starting SG. Yeasts have different alcohol tolerances. Highest I've found is Lalvin 1118 and Lalvin QA23 (newer yeast and a bit harder to find). I believe the yeasts rated to champagne have higher alchohol tolerances also.

    pinc
     
  8. Feb 15, 2014 #8

    sledman765

    sledman765

    sledman765

    Junior

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2013
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Wow! A lot of great information. Thanks!


    Sent from my iPhone using Wine Making
     
  9. Feb 15, 2014 #9

    derunner

    derunner

    derunner

    Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2012
    Messages:
    430
    Likes Received:
    20
    I recently back sweetened 6 gals of hard cider with 4 large cans of frozen concentrate. I wanted to avoid lowering ABV anymore than necessary, so I first simmered the apple juice concentrate to about 1/2 volume. I stopped when it seemed like it might be starting to caramelize.
     
    cintipam likes this.
  10. Feb 18, 2014 #10

    PAFruitWines

    PAFruitWines

    PAFruitWines

    Junior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2014
    Messages:
    80
    Likes Received:
    36
    I'm a noob and other than a 4 gal batch of DB concentrates R the only thing I have done. I use 2 cans per gallon then after fermentation I back sweeten w/1 can per gallon and maybe some sugar if U want it a little sweeter. It reduces UR abv by approx. 10%. If U start around 15% U will B around 13.5% when finished. Very drinkable stuff to get stashed while I ponder what to make for longer term aging.


    Sent from my iPhone using Wine Making
     
  11. Feb 20, 2014 #11

    3274mike

    3274mike

    3274mike

    Michigan Member

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2011
    Messages:
    163
    Likes Received:
    64
    also you should know when adding the concentrates that some of them will add gas and you will want to let it bulk age or degass it. If you bottle right away you will not be happy if in a little while you un cork one and it pops out like champain. just saying this because i have done it.

    just a note to newbies
     
  12. Feb 20, 2014 #12

    wineforfun

    wineforfun

    wineforfun

    Still Trying To Make The Perfect Wine and Now Tryi

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2012
    Messages:
    2,707
    Likes Received:
    892
    Try using 4 cans per gallon and you will get more flavor on the front end. You won't need as much concentrate when backsweetening.
     
  13. Feb 22, 2014 #13

    Geronimo

    Geronimo

    Geronimo

    Norges Skaal!

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2011
    Messages:
    732
    Likes Received:
    135
    I've used concentrates and love the flavor, but have gotten haze from it more than once. Not all concentrates are crystal clear.
     

Share This Page