Quantcast

Antique ceramic crocks for fermentation vessels

Wine Making Talk

Help Support Wine Making Talk:

B

Bob

Guest
I notice quite a few questions/comments fermentation vessels. I just started winemaking and was on a tight budget. Started shopping around for ceramic crocks at garage sales, antique stores, and craigs list. Quite a few out there and if you shop around you can find a good deal. Most I paid was $30 and that was for a 10 gal crock. Caution: watch for hairline cracks, inside chips, and pinholes. Fill the crock and let it sit for a few days to check for leakage before you use it. Works well for fermention but useless for secondaries.
 

twissty

Member
Joined
Sep 19, 2007
Messages
88
Reaction score
0
I bet that 10 gallon crock makes a cool primary!

The only disadvantages to stonware is that it's heavy and breakable.

For a smaller batch, a stainless steel stock pot will work also.
 

cpfan

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 5, 2006
Messages
4,867
Reaction score
193
Bob:

I paid less than $30 for a brand new 12 US gallon primary fermenter with a lid. Under $20, I think.

Steve
 

raw

Junior
Joined
Nov 16, 2008
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
Got Lead?

Someone suggested that a friend with cancer try Kombucha Tea which is made from fermented black tea. It seemed dangerous to home brew and I read about deaths from lead poisonings from people making it in old ceramic.

That was from long term exposure but why take a chance? You are also assuming that no other dangerous chemicals (that may not be noticeable) are in the crock.

Sorry to be such a downer as a total noob but this post kind of jumped out at me.
 

Benjo's Mom

Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2008
Messages
57
Reaction score
0
My dad used to make the best homemade root beer I've ever had in an old, large ceramic crock. Good homebrew too. My uncle still has it. I need to trade him some bottles for a batch of brew:D
 

petes

Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2008
Messages
59
Reaction score
0
I'd very much like to have a few large crocks kicking around. But not for fermenting in.
I use water bottles, 11,15 and 19 litre. All #7 no less; which I'm aware is an absolute no no in many eyes. I'd rather stick to them then use a crock, previous useage unknown.
FWIW.
 

TheTooth

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 20, 2008
Messages
479
Reaction score
3
Bob:

I paid less than $30 for a brand new 12 US gallon primary fermenter with a lid. Under $20, I think.

Steve
Agreed. I just bought a new 8 gallon plastic fermenter with lid for $23 just last week. They are even cheaper if you don't want a lid.
 

Madriver Wines

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 6, 2009
Messages
602
Reaction score
0
My crock is stoneware and no cracks. It is sterile when needed but heavy. No lead or any other chemicals from it .
Steve
 

wine08057

Junior
Joined
Jul 7, 2009
Messages
19
Reaction score
0
Primary fermenter

I use Rubbermaid 20 Gal. BRUTE Container without Lid, Gray.
The Gray ones are food grade and about $20 WITH lid included at your local Hardware store or home depot... They make great primary fermenters and are cheap enough to buy several for different varietals or blending!
 

Madriver Wines

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 6, 2009
Messages
602
Reaction score
0
I have heard of people using them. Do you reuse them time and again?? I just have trouble paying 50 bucks for a plastic tub. I am really thinking of going big say 15 gal batches or more.
 

wine08057

Junior
Joined
Jul 7, 2009
Messages
19
Reaction score
0
Brute

Yes, they last forever. Just sanitize before use

If you want to make 15 gallons, use a 20 gallon brute with lid (need to leave room at the top so it doesn't spill over during primary fermentation)
they come in 30 and 40 gallon sizes also for bigger batches but I find 15 gallon batches are more manageable.
 

Madriver Wines

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 6, 2009
Messages
602
Reaction score
0
I have to agree. That is all I would want to tackle at one time since I have to move the batch at different stages to different parts of the house. Not enough room here to explain why lol.
 

Latest posts

Top