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Amber wine in concrete egg (kvevri)

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George_A

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The white wine in Georgian style ( Amber wine) I made this vintage from Chardonnay grapes fermented and aged with skins, stalks ( pomace or chacha in Georgian) in egg shaped concrete wine tank.
It remained there until the end of November (2 months). This process took place in a relatively constant temperature of about 12-15 ° C ( 53-59 F), which is possible due to fall weather in Canada and big thermal mass of concrete kvevri. During this time the wine was enriched by a number of substances derived mainly from the skins, stems, and the lees. However, the seeds which during fermentation sink to the bottom first, had only limited contact with the wine, thanks to the egg shape of the kvevri, which prevented the excessive extraction of bitter tannins. The wine is already clear and very tasty.
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Boatboy24

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Wow. Very cool.

How do you clean the inside of the kvevri?
 

balatonwine

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concrete kvevri
I thought that a kvevril was specifically earthenware or ceramic, usually buried into the ground. They even have UNESCO recognition. While concrete may be a great modern substitute, is it correct to still call it a kvevril simply because of shape alone? After all, egg shaped tanks are also available in polyethylene, and they are not called kvevril. And one can not call it "champagne" anymore, unless it comes from Champagne France. ;)
 
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George_A

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Wow. Very cool.
How do you clean the inside of the kvevri?
I just scrub a little bit and rinse using a hose, drain all through the bottom valve.


I thought that a kvevril was specifically earthenware or ceramic, usually buried into the ground. They even have UNESCO recognition. While concrete may be a great modern substitute, is it correct to still call it a kvevril simply because of shape alone? After all, egg shaped tanks are also available in polyethylene, and they are not called kvevril. And one can not call it "champagne" anymore, unless it comes from Champagne France. ;)
You are right the traditional kvevris are made from terracotta or stone that's why I named my vessel 'QVEVRICA". IMHO the "QVEVRICA" allows to implement the traditional Georgian technique of prolonged skin contact which in the case of the whites makes the strongly amber - colored wines , adds the tannins, polyphenols and a particular earthy and clear body to the wines.

In this process is the wine skimmed off the top only? Or is the pomace at the bottom pressed?
The wine from the top was the best and is being consumed ( the usual way for the qvevri's wines in Georgia which are mostly consumed young ) . The pomace was pressed and the wine is ageing.

Very interesting. How many gallons is the egg and how did you make it?
200 lit( around 50 gallons) it was made by using GFRC ( glass fiber reinforced concrete) technique. valve.jpg
 

JohnT

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Is the wine in contact with the cement (or is there some sort of food safe coating on the inside?
 

joeswine

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this concept has been around for centuries, nice to see it used, is the vessel all clay ,how did you attack the metal ?
 

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