Aging on the lees (Sur Lie aging)

Discussion in 'General Wine Making Forum' started by masic2000, Dec 8, 2018 at 2:33 AM.

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  1. Dec 8, 2018 at 2:33 AM #1

    masic2000

    masic2000

    masic2000

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    Has anyone tried aging white wine while leaving some sediment in the aging vessel?

    According to the Wine Academy,

    The Benefits of Sur Lie Aging
    Beyond picking up additional flavors and aromas there are a couple benefits to sur lie aging. First, the binding of proteins to tannins serves to remove tannins and shape the mouthfeel of the wine.

    Second, the layers of lees in the bottom of your aging vessel absorb oxygen thus protecting it as it serves up new character. So not only are you adding complexity, removing unwanted tannins, and shaping your wine you’re also setting it up for maximum protection against oxidation.
     
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  2. Dec 8, 2018 at 3:42 AM #2

    dralarms

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    Interesting
     
  3. Dec 8, 2018 at 5:56 AM #3

    sour_grapes

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    Yup, I age most of my whites sur lie over the winter. This is for wines that I do in more of a "fat" style, as opposed to a real crisp style. I have done Viognier, Chardonnay, and Pinot Gris (this winter) that way. D47 yeast (or QA23) is supposed to be good for aging sur lie.
     
  4. Dec 8, 2018 at 1:25 PM #4

    Stressbaby

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    Listened to an Inside Winemaking podcast yesterday with a Riesling winemaker from Europe who throws everything in a barrel, lets it ferment, and doesn't rack it for up to 8 years. They touched on the second point, which really has to do with the fact that the yeast doesn't die, and the low level metabolic processes related to the small numbers of living yeast take up oxygen and protect the wine from oxidation.
     
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