Advice on vines sought by a reeeeeaall beginner

Discussion in 'Grape Growing & Vineyard Forum' started by Art2019, Nov 7, 2019.

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  1. Nov 7, 2019 #1

    Art2019

    Art2019

    Art2019

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    And when I say real....

    Attaching shots of a vine we planted this past spring here in Southern California. We have no flat land, hence the pot. It started well, I trimmed off a third shoot and trained the others to grow northward. As the very hot summer dragged on I attached the mesh you see over the top. No idea if that was a good idea and/or if I did it too late.

    There are still some green leaves at the top here in early November, but as you can hopefully tell the vine itself is brown and looks dead to my untrained eye. I should add that it never flourished as well or as quickly as I'd hoped, topping out where you see it in the photo (hope you can see!) with not too many leaves and to be sure no tiny grape clusters (that I was of course prepared to cut off and dispose of).

    Have I over-watered? Under-watered? Is the vine in fact dead, or will it resurrect itself after our terrible winter? And if so, should I cut it back to the base?

    Clearly I'm in need of help! All suggestions gratefully appreciated.

    Art
     

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  2. Nov 7, 2019 #2

    bshef

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    Highland Meadow Vineyard

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    I know nothing about California growing season but that vine looks great to me. The stems should brown up as they mature. I’m sure your California neighbors will chime in with better information and advice.
     
  3. Nov 8, 2019 #3

    srcorndog

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    Put the vine in the ground! Remember it is a vine treat it like a vine cut it back to pencil size in the dead of winter. Be vigorous visit vineyards close to you and plant what they grow.
     
  4. Nov 10, 2019 at 7:34 PM #4

    Art2019

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    My thanks to both of you! Sdog... pardon the idiot here, but when you say cut it back to pencil size, are you referring to cutting both of the shoots back to where they branch off from the main stem? If so, how close do you recommend? And of course our dead of winter is one night of 38 degrees in January...

    In truth this is kind of a pilot project. We do have a sort of flattish area at the top of the property, and my thought was to first try growing down where it's accessible. Call it proof of principle. If after a year or two I'm successful then I can clear that slight slope and put in a dozen feet or so (whatever fits) of proper vines. Well, that's the theory anyway.

    I greatly appreciate the advice!
     
  5. Nov 10, 2019 at 11:53 PM #5

    srcorndog

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    Cut both back to size of a pencil plant in the ground. Remember you will need a soil sample before you plant a larger number of vines. Ground needs to be balanced.
    One question was this vine a graft ? If so don't cut below the graft. Graft will look like a knot on the stem . Remember plant more vine and drink more wine!
     
  6. Nov 11, 2019 at 6:16 PM #6

    Art2019

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    Great great great. Thank you grandly, srcorndog. (oh, and no, not a graft... that would be for experts like you!)
     
  7. Nov 11, 2019 at 8:56 PM #7

    GreginND

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    For the record, when they say "pencil size" they are referring to the girth of the cane. You should prune back the previous year's growth to the point that the cane is pencil thick (or thicker if you need to prune back more).
     
  8. Nov 12, 2019 at 10:05 PM #8

    Art2019

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    Thanks, Greg. Very kind of you to add to my understanding!
     

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