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Adding sulphites to the secondary?

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arcticsid

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I am still a lil confused on this. Adding sulphites when racking makes sense, but do you add them when transfering it to the secondary?

If I am transfering, lets say, 5 gallons into a secondary, Only a week or so ago I added 1/4 tsp to the original fermentation. Is it necessary to add more into the secondary? Assuming the secondary may be "bulk aging for 5 or 6 weeks, is this recommended to add more, or, should more be added only when it goes to the third stage? And how much?

Again, assuming the proper(recommended amount) was included in the initial fermentation, how long will it last?

i quess what I mean is that, if the wine will remain in the secondary for a while, will the initial dose of sulphites carry it until it is ready to be racked a second time? If I decide to bulk age in the secondary for longer than 5 or 6 weeks, at what point do I want to re-sulphite to protect the wine.

Hope you know what I am trying to ask, because I have no idea! LOL

:tz

Troy
 

cpfan

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Troy, it sounds like you don't totally understand the use of K-meta.

1) K-meta is added pre-fermentation to stun any wild yeasts. You wait 24 hours for the SO2 to dissipate, and then pitch the wine yeast.

2) The wine is transferred to secondary once the fermentation slows down. Adding K-meta at this point might stun the wine yeast and cause a stuck fermentation, so I would not recommend adding any.

3) K-meta and K-sorbate are added as part of stabilizing the wine after the fermentation is complete, ie the wine is dry.

4) If aging the wine, additional K-meta may be added to provide additional protection from oxidation.

Hope this helps, Steve
 

Wade E

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If you are talking about sulfites added before fermentation started to stun wild yeasts then most of that is gone due to vigorous fermentation so adding 1/4 tsp when done fermenting is needed. After that has been added its only needed between 3-4 months apart after that.
 

arcticsid

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Okay, I get 1 and 2. I have been transferring my primary around 1.020 or so.

So should I add abit more right away, or wait till it comes down to. 1.00 or so?

Still confused.

Thanks for the response.

Troy
 

Wade E

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Never add any while its fermenting!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

arcticsid

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Wade, I know that!!!! But should I check my secondary until I know it is no longer fermenting and then give it a "shot"? How much?

I dont want to over sulphithe, I just want to keep it safe. Should I dissolve it in a bit of water or must and just pour it in or stir it in?

If I plan to keep it in the secondary container for a while, do I need to add sulphites ever "x" amount of time?


Please advise.
Troy
 
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cpfan

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So should I add abit more right away, or wait till it comes down to. 1.00 or so?
Troy
No more K-meta until it's done fermenting FOR CERTAIN. Below .995 if possible, and lower still is good,

Don't be in a rush, let it sit for a week, a month, whatever.

Steve
 

PPBart

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I am still a lil confused on this. Adding sulphites when racking makes sense, but do you add them when transfering it to the secondary?
I have a quote from Jack Kellar's website in the standard footer for the form I use to document each step of each batch:

“If you add Campden or pot meta at the time of the 1st racking, add it again at the 3rd and 5th rackings and before bottling (when stabilizing the wine). This should be done whether the recipe mentions it or not.”

That reminds me routinely to keep the protection in place.
 

kiljoy

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Troy,

I have the same question. I also read the same quote on Jack Keller’s site. That just made me more confused because it was not what they were telling me on this site. From what I’ve gathered, you can hit it with sulfite when you stabilize and then you can hit it every few months if you bulk age for any length of time. I think it was between 4 and 6, but can’t remember.
 

Tom

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Understand Jack's site has alot of old info and info sent in by others (beginers) and he posted it. Listen here for the current and BEST advise. Wade and his mods as well as alot of members can set you on the straight and narrow.
 

Wade E

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Adding stuff that may stress out your yeast is not recommended. Even Chaptalizing isnt a great method but at least that if done properly is actually feeding your yeast not hindering them. Another note is that there are terms that we may confuse with another like racking and transferring, these are actually 2 different things. Racking is the act of going from carboy to carboy and transferring is the act of going from Primary to carboy(usually done when still fermenting). When racking your wine is almost always done fermenting but when transferring it can have a low sg or be done fermenting.
 

arcticsid

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You're absolutely right Wade, terms need to be clarified. I am quilty of mixing them up to. Makes it hard on beginers when we do that. We use the FPAC also to describe backsweetening, and that isn't correct either.
 

Wade E

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An F-pac is usually sweetening as there is almost always some kind of sugar in there.
 

arcticsid

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What I mean is than an F-pac is usually used to describe a step in kit making. Am I correct? And although it is used to sweeten, when making a "scratch" wine, making a syrup of some sort to backsweeten is often refered to as an F-pac.

Please advise.
 

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