Adding body

Discussion in 'General Wine Making Forum' started by wineview, Mar 19, 2019.

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  1. Mar 22, 2019 #21

    wineview

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  2. Mar 22, 2019 #22

    wineview

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    Can tannin be added at bottling time?
     
  3. Mar 22, 2019 #23

    wineview

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    Not sure if you are joking or not about the banana peels.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2019
  4. Mar 22, 2019 #24

    stickman

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    Most tannin products recommend a minimum bulk aging time before bottling, usually in the 3 to 6 week range, though there may be a few specific products that can be used closer to bottling. When tannin is added there are several reactions that take place over time, this often causes a precipitate that will fall out and it's probably better for this to happen in bulk rather than in bottle.
     
  5. Mar 22, 2019 #25

    wineview

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    That was my gut feeling. The wine has been in bulk for almost 6 months.

    About adding tannin. I racked the wine three times and it's pretty clear. Is there a need to rack again before adding the tannin? My concern is possibly disturbing any sediment that might still be in the carboy when I stir in the tannin. Or, doesn't it matter at this time since I will be leaving it for another six weeks anyway. And finally, should the tannin be dissolved in a bit of wine before added?

    Thanks
     
  6. Mar 22, 2019 #26

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    That is my feeling. It doesn't matter too much, as it will settle out again pretty quickly.

    Yes, that would be best.
     
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  7. Mar 22, 2019 #27

    stickman

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    I agree with sour above, and would add that stirring the lees with the tannin addition may help increase the body. On the other hand I wouldn't recommend stirring the lees on a red wine less than 4 months old, as this can result in a loss of color, but you're past that stage.
     
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  8. Mar 23, 2019 #28

    FTC Wines

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    Stickman, why would we lose color stirring the lees in a wine less than 4 months old? Does that mean that you can lose color racking a young Red? Just curious. Roy
     
  9. Mar 23, 2019 #29

    stickman

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    There's nothing wrong with racking a young red wine, the object is getting the wine to settle quickly and moving the wine off of the lees initially. The color in a young red wine is monomeric and unstable until it reacts and becomes polymeric pigment, this happens over time during the first 4 months or so, though it is variable to some extent depending on storage conditions. Suspended lees can attack monomeric color by adsorption as well as enzymatic degradation. It's all a compromise as there may be times when stirring is needed or desired, so I wouldn't change established good procedures, I was just trying to point out don't be excessive with the stirring on a young red. Once the color is polymeric, stirring the lees is back on the table if desired.
     
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  10. Mar 23, 2019 #30

    wineview

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    I am assuming this theory would not apply to white.
     
  11. Mar 23, 2019 #31

    stickman

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    White is a completely different story.
     
  12. Mar 23, 2019 #32

    wineview

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    Do you care to elaborate
     
  13. Mar 23, 2019 #33

    stickman

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    No long elaboration is needed, white wine doesn't have a significant amount of color and the associated reactions.
     
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