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hypro290

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Sorry if this is already covered in the forums somewhere but I need a little advice.

I'm in full swing of my winter winemaking and working some of the leftover kits from the close out of Spagnol's Vancouver so I got the kits for half price or less.Some of them are mid to high end red kits so on a discount buy I thought I'd experiment a bit. I did a Chilean Melbec from juice that came of too tart but and did a 2nd fermentation with MLF that dialed that up right smartly. But some of the kits suffer of the same thing - too tart. But besides I've been told that MLF is not a good idea and expensive to you. I did inherit some AcidX and some Acid Blend packages. But I'm getting eye crossed on the net whether it will help and how?
 

jswordy

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To reduce acidity in wine, you can use sparing amounts of potassium bicarbonate (commonly sold as a stomach calmer) or sodium bicarbonate (baking soda). Be very sparing in adding these and be sure they are entirely in solution before adding more.

pH test strips are a good thing to have to know exactly what acidity you are working with, but taste is also a reliable indicator. It is difficult to go back to acid after adding the base elements, so go slowly and allow plenty of time between additions until you get what you want. It may be helpful to bench test a small portion first to see if you get the desired result.

WMT has a Beginning Winemaking section and an Advanced Winemaking section where this question would likely have gotten a quicker response., Good luck.
 

Boatboy24

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Potassium carbonate (as opposed to bicarbonate) can also be used. It is gentler, but requires cold stabilization to drop the acid out. IIRC, it is 1g/L to reduce pH by 0.1. As with anything having to do with acid adjustments, go halfway first. Then further adjust if needed.
 

Tnuscan

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Sorry if this is already covered in the forums somewhere but I need a little advice.

I'm in full swing of my winter winemaking and working some of the leftover kits from the close out of Spagnol's Vancouver so I got the kits for half price or less.Some of them are mid to high end red kits so on a discount buy I thought I'd experiment a bit. I did a Chilean Melbec from juice that came of too tart but and did a 2nd fermentation with MLF that dialed that up right smartly. But some of the kits suffer of the same thing - too tart. But besides I've been told that MLF is not a good idea and expensive to you. I did inherit some AcidX and some Acid Blend packages. But I'm getting eye crossed on the net whether it will help and how?
EDIT: I didn't realize that the Chilean Malbec was a juice pail.
 
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hypro290

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EDIT: I didn't realize that the Chilean Malbec was a juice pail.
Sorry for the confusion but I was discussing the Chilean Malbec juice originally but I had done the MLF treatment (second fermentation) with it and it was successful. It was about the kits that came out a little tart for my liking. I think you answered my question and also the is a winemakers academy on Wastebook too. They said to use a simple syrup and I have some wine conditioner that has worked before so I'll have go at it as well. Between your comments and there's I think you answered my questions - thank you.

It's not bad wine but it I like to learn to make mine better.
 

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