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A slight effervescence to our Tempranillo

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RHansen95693

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We are on our 2nd year on making a Tempranillo from our own little vineyard. We pressed a little less than 50 gallons about 5 months ago and are using a stainless steel fermenting barrel. We racked the wine about 3 months ago and all was good but in racking again today, I noticed a slight effervescence on the tongue that wasn't there before. The color and smell are both good. Any ideas on whats going on? Is there anyway to get rid of the effervescence before bottling?
 

ceeaton

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It's probably residual CO2. Unless you have a way to "degas" your wine, time is your friend. What temperature is it being bulk aged at? I've noticed that in my basement that fluctuates between ~ 52*F and 68*F, I've still had residual CO2 in my wine at 18 months. To double check that the issue is residual CO2, put some of the wine in a small container that you can cover the opening with your thumb, shake vigorously, and when you let your thumb off, if it has obvious pressure built up in the bottle that releases in a "poof", it's CO2.

Did you have this same issue with last years vintage? If not, did you do something different that you didn't do this year (ie. were any of the steps you used to make your wine this year different)?
 

Johnd

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In addition to what @ceeaton said, if the effervescence wasn’t there before, it could also have undergone MLF, which could be the responsible party.
 

RHansen95693

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It's probably residual CO2. Unless you have a way to "degas" your wine, time is your friend. What temperature is it being bulk aged at? I've noticed that in my basement that fluctuates between ~ 52*F and 68*F, I've still had residual CO2 in my wine at 18 months. To double check that the issue is residual CO2, put some of the wine in a small container that you can cover the opening with your thumb, shake vigorously, and when you let your thumb off, if it has obvious pressure built up in the bottle that releases in a "poof", it's CO2.

Did you have this same issue with last years vintage? If not, did you do something different that you didn't do this year (ie. were any of the steps you used to make your wine this year different)?
Thank you... thank you... thank you!!!! I think you have hit it right on the head!!!! I put about a cup in a small container, shook it up and it definitely had the "poof." To take it one step further, the more I shook it and tasted, the more that effervescence went away. Now the question is, how can i get rid of it before we bottle?
 

ceeaton

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Kinda what I was thinking and I appreciate the reinforcement of my thoughts!!!!
If you have the wine in a cool place, if there is anyway to warm it up temporarily a few degrees it will make your degassing more effective. I know you probably can't move the stainless steal barrel, I was thinking of warming the barrel up where it is, don't know if you have that capability. It will still degas at a lower temperature, it may take more rackings than at a warmer temperature.
 

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