A few questions!

Discussion in 'Wine Making from Grapes' started by CK55, Sep 12, 2018.

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  1. CK55

    CK55 Senior Member

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    I'm buying some Sangiovese grapes tomorrow morning and will be going to get them, I'm wondering if you guys have any tips for Sangiovese. I have not worked with the grape before. I am thinking about going with either RC 212 or BM 4X4 yeast, what would you use, and any tips for oaking it?

    Grapes will be picked up from the Paso Robles area of California for reference and will be sitting at 25 Brix as they were tested today.

    Thanks
     
  2. Johnd

    Johnd Large Member Supporting Member

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    I wouldn’t hesitate to use either yeast, but BM 4x4 would be my first choice. Oak / age in a barrel if you can, if not, the bigger the staves you use, the better, IMHO.
     
  3. pgentile

    pgentile Supporting Members Supporting Member

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    I'm currently doing a batch of brunello (supposedly old vine sangiovese) grapes. Crushed on Saturday pitched rc212, CH16 MLB yeaterday, coming along nicely, 23 brix at start. Will end up in new barrel at some point, but otherwise I would use med oak staves/spirals/chips. BM4x4 would be fine too.

    What about MLF on yours?

    i have Paso Robles zin coming in a few weeks.
     
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  4. CK55

    CK55 Senior Member

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    I have a tube of White Labs Malolactic bacteria culture. I purchased it already and will grab the yeast tommorrow on my way back. I have read that sangiovese is typically a wine drank when young, usually within the first 2 years. As to oaking it i was just going to use a stave/spiral since i dont have a barrel for it. I will just have to be careful to not overdo it.
     
  5. pgentile

    pgentile Supporting Members Supporting Member

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    The first all grape batch I made was 4 or 5 years ago with inexpensive sangiovese. Did not oak it, would have to look up the yeast, but I still feel it was one of my best. No bottles survived beyond 18 months.

    I have used White Labs malo with good results.
     
  6. CK55

    CK55 Senior Member

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    Ive made wine several times, but not with this grape, and since grapes can take wildly different approaches depending on varietal I wanted to ask and see what you guys had to say.
     
  7. Donz

    Donz Member

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    Actually Sangiovese ages very well. Brunello wines are aged 5 years before release. 2 years on oak minimum.
     
  8. Farmside

    Farmside Junior

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    I have a real nob question, being a newbie here, but once your wine has stopped fermenting and has been racked into a clean carboy to clear, why not just cap it over installing an airlock/bung? For info I am disabled with weight restrictions so using 1 gallon carboys. I’m not even sure if larger ones are threaded for caps (that might be the answer)
     
  9. GreenEnvy22

    GreenEnvy22 Senior Member

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    Your wine still will have some carbon dioxide in it after fermentation, so it needs to be able to vent that. If it's a solid lid your wine won't degas at best, and at worst could shatter the carboy or pop the lid off if small amounts of co2 are still being produced. Changes in temperature also will affect the volume so it needs to be able to adjust. That second one isn't as important in 1 gallon containers as larger ones, but still matters. You can get 1-way silicon bungs that will let co2 vent but not let air back in.
     
  10. CK55

    CK55 Senior Member

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    Brunello is actually a special clone of sangiovese. But yeah.bog standard sangio is recommended to.be drank young.
     
  11. Farmside

    Farmside Junior

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    Thanks! I kind of thought there was a logical answer and had already ordered in a screw-on cap that has a formed hole for an airlock. Changed it on a gallon of peach wine that was just racked, sure enough I heard gas release while removing the cap I had on it. Sure looked as though the fermentation was over ...... so far I’m liking this hobby. Keeps the brain busy figuring it out, even more fun drinking your results.
     
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  12. Donz

    Donz Member

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    Real Brunello is 100% Sangiovese grown in Montalcino only. I just spent 10 days there.
     
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  13. jgareri

    jgareri Member

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    Correct. It's full name is Brunello Di montalcino. Same kind of concept as Champagne
     
  14. CK55

    CK55 Senior Member

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    Brix went up to about 26 so i got good grapes, went and picked them and got home and crushed them and added sulphites to them to kill anything off. And will go ahead and add my yeast tommorrow I picked up BM4x4 as it is a better sangiovese yeast.
     
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  15. CK55

    CK55 Senior Member

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    Again its a specific clone of sangiovese. its unique solely to that area and tastes different.
     
  16. CK55

    CK55 Senior Member

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    Its happily fermenting away.
     
  17. pgentile

    pgentile Supporting Members Supporting Member

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    That is correct but I don't think the growers and marketers of California grapes care especially Regina/Pia. They are calling their supposed old vine sangio Brunello, They sell both sangio and brunello in their standard tier grapes and their premium. Maybe the Brunello vines were cloned/propagated directly from Montalcino, but they are still just sangiovese grapes.
     
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  18. Donz

    Donz Member

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    Guess that is called good marketing lol.
     
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  19. Ajmassa5983

    Ajmassa5983 Member Supporting Member

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    I’ve heard many people struggle with the white labs viles of liquid malo. Just don’t take it for granted. Do all the necessary steps to ease that MLf along.

    Also, the Sangiovese grapes, continuing what we spoke about in PM, how was the color? After all the talk about being much lighter than anticipated, did that hold true? Or did they come on a little darker?
    And you still got plans to blend in some Malbec or something?
     
  20. CK55

    CK55 Senior Member

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    As of now it's a fairly light color and doesn't seem to be getting darker as it ferments. I can tell you I'm 99% sure it will be a pale red wine that you can easily see through. I won't be blending anything as I wasn't able to get any other grapes. My vines are not old enough to produce. And the criolla is taking it's time.
     

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