5 gallon Primo water jug for fermenting???

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BigDaveK

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Personally I would use them in an absolute emergency for a short of time as possible.

They're rated for water but not necessarily the acids and alcohol in wine. Chemicals might leach. Aren't they usually a blue tint? Food safe containers are always a good idea. What's the plastic code on them? Maybe they changed.

I understand your desire to use them. I have 8 in my barn because I thought they'd be useful someday for something.
 

vinny

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Personally I would use them in an absolute emergency for a short of time as possible.

They're rated for water but not necessarily the acids and alcohol in wine. Chemicals might leach. Aren't they usually a blue tint? Food safe containers are always a good idea. What's the plastic code on them? Maybe they changed.

I understand your desire to use them. I have 8 in my barn because I thought they'd be useful someday for something.
I was given a plastic carboy. I thought 'hey, it might come in handy', but with all the time and effort, patience, and everything else given to wine making I will only use glass. From other endeavours, it is ingrained in me not to 'taint' your final product with concerns of leaching or anything else. I use glass carboys, wine bottles, milk bottles, and mason jars.

You may feel differently, but the cost is cheap. Especially if you can find used equipment. I got everything you need for doing multiple batches for $100. For me the cost is worth the peace of mind and attention to quality.
 
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Would they be ok for the primary 7-10 days or so?
I would not use any plastic that is not rated for winemaking -- wine is acidic and alcoholic, and can leach chemicals from the plastic. I use Rubbermaid Brutes for large batches, and even with purpose-made primary fermenters, I get wine out of plastic and into glass or wood (and stainless steel if I had it) as quickly as feasible.

Besides, fermenting in open container provides yeast with the O2 it needs to reproduce. Fermenting in a carboy reduces the amount of available O2, so the yeast will reproduce slower.
 

Jusatele

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Is it food safe?
look under it there is a number, us that number on a plastics chart to see if it is food safe
yes plastic is good for fermentation. the problem is if it is easy to clean.
my latest fermenter is a Spidel (hope I spelled that correct) fermenter, they are a world wide respected brand of fermenters for the hobby brewer.
and they are built easy to clean.
a problem with plastics is they get scratched, in those scratches bacterial or wild yeast can hide. So do not use things to clean them that can scratch. Also not all plastics are food safe, that is a big thing, only use food safe plastics. When getting a used plastic item to use, find out what has been in it.

i use the plastic Spidel
Rack into a plastic carboy for secondary
next rack is plastic for clearing
then glass for aging

now saying all that, Lowes sells those blue buckets with white lids that are the preferred food safe level. are cheap and only need the lid drilled for a bubbler stopper.
 

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