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45 Day Kit wines, and how to replicate?

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Jswo23

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So at this point im a few kits in, all being 45 day kits. I just started my first batch of Cab. Sauv. made from fresh juice from a local produce supplier. My question what can winemaker do to replicate this quick wine drink-ability, while using whole sale fresh juice? Most recipes calls for at least a year to be drink worthy, and yet i can drink a bottle of kit wine in a few months and it taste pretty darn good.
 

richmke

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You can't. The more simple the juice, the quicker it is ready. The more complex, the longer it takes for time to do the work to integrate the flavors. IMHO, the pails manufacturers are not targeting the 45-day crowd. By the time someone upgrades to fresh juice, they are expecting more than what the cheap kits can deliver.
 

Jswo23

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You can't. The more simple the juice, the quicker it is ready. The more complex, the longer it takes for time to do the work to integrate the flavors. IMHO, the pails manufacturers are not targeting the 45-day crowd. By the time someone upgrades to fresh juice, they are expecting more than what the cheap kits can deliver.
understandable, but i plan on buying permits to sell wine, how do i cut the turnover rate down so i can build a inventory?
 

Scooter68

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Cut the turnover time you mean? Think the response is - not likely to happen if you want to keep it economically feasible. In fact if you are really going to sell wine you would be better off looking larger than Pail size purchases.

The difference in taste is going to limit your customer interest with a 45 day product. Don't think anyone who drinks much wine will go for those kit wine bottles as a purchase unless they are used to buying wine by the box. Sorry if that sounds snobbish but I think that's a realistic view.
 

StBlGT

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The fresh juice indeed should be overall better than a kit. However, i wouldn't exactly say a 6 or 8 week kit tastes like box wine. Some kits really are respectable and can compete with some really nice commercial wines.
 

ceeaton

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I resemble that comment. The right boxed wine makes a perfectly good wine to top off a batch, as long as you aren't adding liters and liters of the boxed wine.

I don't understand how you are going to be able to afford the license to sell wine if you are making such small batches.
 

drainsurgeon

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The fresh juice indeed should be overall better than a kit. However, i wouldn't exactly say a 6 or 8 week kit tastes like box wine. Some kits really are respectable and can compete with some really nice commercial wines.
I agree. I feel that most of the kit wines I have made, even the 4 week kits are way better than a $6 or even $12/bottle wines on the shelf. The 6 week kits are up there with $20/bottle wines that I have tasted. And it does not take a year to get there either, IMHO. :h
 

Scooter68

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The fresh juice indeed should be overall better than a kit. However, i wouldn't exactly say a 6 or 8 week kit tastes like box wine. Some kits really are respectable and can compete with some really nice commercial wines.
I'm saying a kit wine would be an improvement over box wines - how much... that's the question. How much 'tweaking' of the juice is done by chemicals etc at the plant and other things - leaving the question of how long is that kit wine going to keep. As I understand (Perhaps incorrectly) Those kit wines are meant to be 'created' and consumed in a much short time frame. So unless sold and consumed within a year the quality might be lacking. That would mean a short shelf life or potentially unhappy customers.

And as mentioned cost for small batches as well as time invested.... Have to question how much profit would be in that. You can only cut so many corners before either quality and/or profit drops.
 

Johnd

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understandable, but i plan on buying permits to sell wine, how do i cut the turnover rate down so i can build a inventory?
Anyway, back to your topic, my suggestion is to make much larger batches and start now. Establish a business relationship with WE, or RJS, etc, buy bulk juice or grapes and build up now. You can make a lot of wine waiting for winery licenses and alcohol permits, it can take years.

Most wine improves with time, give it as much of this KEY INGREDIENT as you can, maybe sell your early stuff with "best if you wait til" dates on it. My thoughts...........
 

BernardSmith

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understandable, but i plan on buying permits to sell wine, how do i cut the turnover rate down so i can build a inventory?
Is your plan to sell the kits - or the wine from the kits? Selling wine will involve an enormous amount of work with local, state and federal regulators...By all accounts, you are talking years - not months. Have you spoken to any local wineries?
 

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