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Wine Making & Grape Growing Forum > Wine Making > Meads > Very new meadmaker... Orange 'cyser'?

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Old 11-04-2016, 12:03 AM   #1
Jimmer149
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Hi y'all...

First, my only experience with making adult beverages was a few Mr Beer kits a decade or so ago, but when I stumbled across the original BOMM recipe about a month ago, I had to give it a try - and it wasn't half bad!

So here I am, thinkin' I know stuff, and I just put together another orange spice quick mead based on a different recipe that called for orange juice (for flavor, and as a means of starting the yeast - I'm using D47 this time, instead of bread yeast...

...and I've been reading about cysers. So I surmised that if this recipe calls for a cup of orange juice, what'll happen if I dump the whole can of concentrate (along with 2.5lb of clover honey) in there - a weak, orange cyser, if you will?

So yup, I did it - and after an hour, it's happily bubbling away... My question: what can I expect from this unholy mess?

 
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Old 11-04-2016, 02:55 AM   #2
mennyg19
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Don't know what to expect, but be sure to let us know how it comes out!!!
I would suggest you join the WOTM thread. A bunch of people experimenting with recipes for wine.
Either way Good Luck!!!
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Old 11-04-2016, 06:15 AM   #3
BernardSmith
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Hi Jimmer149 - and welcome.
I have made wine from oranges a few times and the wine is incredibly tart although I cut the tartness by adding chocolate nibs or cocoa (chocolate orange). But this tartness (from the acidity of the orange without the balance of sweetness from the sugars) may create an additional challenge in a mead. Honey has no buffers so the pH can oscillate from high to very low - so low that the must/mead becomes too acidic for the yeast and the fermentation stalls. Most seasoned mead makers would not add any acidity to a mead must and only add acidity (if needed) before bottling. Using orange juice as the base for this mead suggests that you may be stressing the cell walls of the yeast. If you have a pH meter I would monitor the fermentation and perhaps be prepared to add K-carbonate to help neutralize some of the acidity..But experimentation - in my opinion - is always a good thing. Good luck!

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Old 11-04-2016, 06:28 AM   #4
Jericurl
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It will probably taste much more like a straight mead and need a wee bit more time to age out until it tastes like something good. Most of mine are questionable until around 6 to 9 months, then shoot up into wonderful rather quickly.

I don't think 1 cup of orange juice will add much flavor overall.
And I second you joining our Wine of the Month club thread.

eta: ok, reading comprehension fail. I just realized you added a whole lot more orange than one cup. HMMMMmmmm.....don't know, this could go either way. How's fermentation going so far?
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Old 11-04-2016, 08:07 AM   #5
botigol
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimmer149 View Post
...and I've been reading about cysers. So I surmised that if this recipe calls for a cup of orange juice, what'll happen if I dump the whole can of concentrate (along with 2.5lb of clover honey) in there...
Just for clarity, it sounds like you're talking about JAOM, not BOMM on your first batch.

Based on my two experiences using orange, backsweetening will be required, because as Bernard mentioned, it will turn out tart. Contributing to this, D47 will make a dry wine, compared to the semi-sweet to sweet wine left by the bread yeast in your first batch, so the dryness will make the tartness stand out even more.

What size batch are you making? A reconstituted can of concentrate usually results in a half of a gallon of juice, so you multiplied the recipe amount by 8. Based on a quick search, it looks like one can of FOJC contains roughly 5 oz of sugar.
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Old 11-04-2016, 11:04 AM   #6
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Welcome Jimmer149, I look forward to hearing how this turns out. I made a spiced mead last year and am planning a basic one for this month, just honey and water. My spiced one is getting better but the jury is still out on if it will ever be drinkable. I have not back sweetened it yet but have stopped myself on two occasions from pouring it down the drain.
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Old 11-04-2016, 11:23 AM   #7
Jimmer149
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Thanks all, for your thoughts and comments. Not experienced enough to know what it all means yet, but I'll answer some questions at random.

My first batch was indeed a by-the-book BOMM, taken from the Gotmead website. The half gallon size made the fermentation time a short 3 weeks, in fact, mine was sampled to death at two weeks, so I racked at that point and drank, as is (was).

This new batch is mostly the recipe below with D47 yeast, yeast nutrient rather than raisins, and of course, the whole can of OJ concentrate. I was hoping for another quick (Christmas) mead, so I guess I'm gonna be disappointed?

http://selfreliantschool.com/how-to-make-quick-mead/

Off to join your mead interest group and continue learning...

Jim


 
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Old 11-04-2016, 11:29 AM   #8
Jimmer149
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To add a few things, this present batch is one gallon and is bubbling happily... And in regard to tartness, can't I just rack at the sweetness level I want, add a yeast neutralizer and stop fermentation at that point? What happens further when I do that?
mead2.jpg  

Reason: added pic

 
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Old 11-04-2016, 11:43 AM   #9
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Interesting, have never heard of BOMM. I too thought you were talking about JAOM. BOMM is similar but definitely not the same.
This guy's website has some interesting mead recipes.
https://denardbrewing.com/blog/category/mead/

@BernardSmith he even has a T'ej recipe.
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Old 11-04-2016, 01:17 PM   #10
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I liken the idea of stopping fermentation in mid process much like the idea of the magician catching a bullet between his (or her ) teeth , if yer knows what I mean. Nice trick but it is all illusion. How will you stop fermentation at the point when you want to? You can certainly slow fermentation down by dropping the temperature but that is not likely to stop all fermentation (I make bread and cheese and often put my dough and my kefir in the fridge and the cold temperature slows the fermentation but does not stop it... And while brewers certainly talk of cold crashing to force their yeast out of suspension and then (presumably) racking their beer off the lees it is never clear to me whether they do this as fermentation ends - and so simply allows them to clarify their brews or whether they in fact have managed to catch that bullet between their teeth,
I am sure that many folk on this forum might disagree but in my opinion the best technique is EITHER to allow the mead to ferment dry , stabilize and then backsweeten. Gives you almost complete control; OR to feed the yeast enough sugar so that they in fact die of alcohol poisoning - remember that yeast have a limited tolerance for alcohol - and then add additional sugar to sweeten this to the level you prefer. This second technique will mean that you are always working with a relatively high ABV and that often means that the aging time for the mead to be pleasant rather than taste hot (because of the alcohol) may need to be thought of as ... um... extensive.

 
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