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Old 11-02-2016, 05:51 PM   #1
jburtner
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I came across this at the store and said why not.... Guess I'll mix it all together and add some nutrient. Take an SG reading. Think it'll be close enough to 1070/1080 w/2g honey and 5g juice?

Any advise?

Thank you!
-jb
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Old 11-02-2016, 06:00 PM   #2
bkisel
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Is that raw unpasteurized cider? I've got 12 gallons of apple cider to wine going right now. I use honey, brown sugar and frozen apple juice concentrate for back sweetening. Reason I've got 12 gallons going now is because of how well last years 6 gallon batch turned out.

So... Apple wine back sweetened with honey!


Ps. You could also make something else but my research suggest it might be illegal.
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Old 11-02-2016, 06:06 PM   #3
jburtner
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It is pasteurized but no preservatives. Will the 2g/5g ratio provide good ABV or do I need more? Figure this will make 7g at least so i'll end up with a solid 6g. Should I add some apples too?

Cheers,
Jb

 
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Old 11-02-2016, 06:18 PM   #4
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I think you're okay with pasteurized but no preservatives but not 100% sure. Unless you've got a recipe showing ratios I would shoot for 10-12% ABV using a hydrometer. Starting SG of 1.080 to 1.090 would probably be good. I'd back sweeten to taste.

I've used raw cider which has a lot of pulp so didn't need or want apples. With pasteurized maybe adding some apple for body would be a good idea.

Here is my recipe compiled from several others...



Primary Ingredients...

6 gallons non-pasteurized, no additive apple cider
1 tsp. tannin
3 tsp. yeast nutrient
1 tsp. yeast energizer
3 tsp. pectic enzyme
3/4 tsp absorbic acid
6-9 tsp acid blend
3-5 tsp bentonite
6-8 pounds sugar - SG 1.080-1.090 - 11% to 12% potential abv
1/4 tsp k-meta
1 packet yeast (EC-1118 or some other white wine yeast) - after 24 hours of above

Degas/Stabilize/Clear...

2 tsp Potassium Sorbate
1/4 tsp k-meta
1 packet(s) SuperKleer

Back Sweeten...

2 cups brown sugar
1 cup honey
2 cans frozen apple juice concentrate
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Old 11-03-2016, 07:05 AM   #5
jburtner
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4x4Lbs so 16Lbs and two gallons of Honey. Any way to determine approx SG with thise numbers?

Thank you!
-johann
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Old 11-03-2016, 07:47 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jburtner View Post
4x4Lbs so 16Lbs and two gallons of Honey. Any way to determine approx SG with thise numbers?

Thank you!
-johann
The average Brix of apple is 13.3, or SG=1.0538, but you'll need to measure what you are using to see what yours is.

Using Fermcalc with the following parameters, Honey @ SG 1.4142, Target SG of 1.080, Initial SG of 1.0538, Initial Volume of 5 gallons, you would need 4.379 pounds of honey to get your SG to 1.080, and you'd have 5.37 gallons of liquid.

If my sugar parameters for the juice and honey are correct, and you use all of the honey, your beginning must would have SG=1.134 and be 6.33 gallons. Beginning SG of 1.134 would yield a wine with ABV approaching 20%. Since no yeast will ferment to 20% (EC-1118 will do +/- 18%), you'll end up with rocket fuel and residual sugar.

Having said that, were I you, this is what I'd do, start with 6 gallons of juice to make sure you end up with a solid 6 gallons, and add your honey slowly, mixing well to ensure proper readings, and use your hydrometer to get to your target of 1.080. As a guideline, using the same parameters as above, 6 gallons of juice would need 5.25 pounds of honey to get to the target 1.080. Again, your juice and honey may have different SG's than the ones I assumed. Hope this helps.
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Old 11-03-2016, 07:56 AM   #7
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How good is your math? One cup honey roughly equals, I've read, two cups of sugar. On average I've used about 7 cups of sugar to get each of my 6 gallon apple cider musts up to ~ SG 1.085.

I've no idea how the sugar content of your cider compares to what I used so so we're just WAGing it. I recommend again that you get yourself a hydrometer or find a recipe using ratios.
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Old 11-03-2016, 08:56 AM   #8
jburtner
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Thank you JohnD and Bill!

Yes I have hydrometer and Brix meter so will open a jug of the juice and measure when I start it up.... Maybe I can brix meter the honey too but it might be off that scale. Low and slow with mixing the honey in sounds good and I'll check out fermcalc for reference... I thought I would be using much more honey but that's ok as it looks like I'll have extra for some different meads then and I'll pic up another gallon or 1.5 of the juice so there is some extra for top-up and tasting as we go

I've never had mead so am very interested in trying this liquid gold nectar of the gods and incorporating it into our cellar with different recipies

Thank you for the input so far it's very helpful!

Do these typically need any additional acids? We don't really ever drink sweet wines so very interested to see how it tastes dry. I imagine that this would take some oak very well too....

Cheers,
johann

 
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Old 11-03-2016, 10:15 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jburtner View Post
Thank you JohnD and Bill!

Yes I have hydrometer and Brix meter so will open a jug of the juice and measure when I start it up.... Maybe I can brix meter the honey too but it might be off that scale. Low and slow with mixing the honey in sounds good and I'll check out fermcalc for reference... I thought I would be using much more honey but that's ok as it looks like I'll have extra for some different meads then and I'll pic up another gallon or 1.5 of the juice so there is some extra for top-up and tasting as we go

I've never had mead so am very interested in trying this liquid gold nectar of the gods and incorporating it into our cellar with different recipies

Thank you for the input so far it's very helpful!

Do these typically need any additional acids? We don't really ever drink sweet wines so very interested to see how it tastes dry. I imagine that this would take some oak very well too....

Cheers,
johann
Apple juice contains a lot of malic acid, which is fairly sharp and strong, so you'll definitely have some acid in there. If you have a meter, go ahead and take a pH reading just to see where you are, your ferment will be sound as long as you are above 3.2 or 3.3, and your wine will be stable as long as you are below 3.6 or 3.7. Since your must will be fairly light in color, you may be able to use the pH test strips, which are harder to read for red wines.

I do note that Bill's recipe contains a couple of different acid additions, he may know something there about apple that I do not, so I'll defer to his experience on that matter.

If you're in the 3.3 - 3.6 range, you should be safe to ferment, and you can do some bench tests later to see if you want to adjust the acid for taste before you bottle your batch.
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Old 11-03-2016, 06:12 PM   #10
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Better to weigh sugar than measure it by volume. One pound of table sugar dissolved in water to make a gallon will raise the gravity by 40 points. One pound of honey dissolved in water to make a gallon will raise the gravity by about 35 points (there being some moisture in the honey that is not in the sugar). How much a cup of either will raise the gravity... I have no idea. How granular the sugar is may result in two cups having very different weights...

 
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