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Old 06-18-2016, 10:19 AM   #1
Jericurl
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I just watched a youtube video....
guy takes 1 gallon of goat milk, 1/2 cup of apple cider vinegar....15 minutes later he has a soft cheese that he seasons with dried herbs.

What does this kind of cheese taste like? Like a mild feta?
Or chevre?

I've been wanting to make cheese for the longest time but thought I would have to get a press and some rennet, etc.

But this! This is totally doable.

And now I plot...
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Old 06-18-2016, 11:03 AM   #2
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Mozzarella 'kits' are easily obtained. Check out our sponsor, Brew and Wine Supply.

PS: Every time I hear the word 'Cheesemakers', I get a chuckle, thinking of Monty Python's 'Life of Brian'.

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Old 06-18-2016, 11:13 AM   #3
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LOL....We say, "What did the Romans ever do for us?!" all the time.

eta:
And yes, once it gets a bit cooler I will definitely be looking into getting some cultures, etc.
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Old 06-18-2016, 12:57 PM   #4
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I soooooo wanted to make Cheve. Bought a cheese making kit and all the right stuff, then found out what it would cost for a gallon of Goats milk from the local coop. Just shook my head as it would cost me $20 to make an 8oz log of Cheve.

I got to Costco and pick up 2 8oz logs of Kirkland Signature Cheve for like $6.95......

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Old 06-18-2016, 03:52 PM   #5
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I think it is worth doing at least once, even at $20 for 8 oz. I just enjoy taking things to work and saying I made them. I use all of my cell mates as guinea pigs when it comes to making a recipe the first time. I'd also like to "cut the cheese" at work and have it edible and not offensive.
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Old 06-18-2016, 05:30 PM   #6
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With a bit of rennet you can make a farmer's cheese out of pasteurized cows milk even. It is a little milder than goat cheese. A gallon will yield a fair amount at around a quart or so. You can mix in your favorite herbs with it or even make a spicy blend and it is delicious. Not much is needed to do it. Get some cheesecloth and unless you want to make a hard cheese not much else is needed. You can buy an inexpensive kit with a the little stuff like a special knife for cutting the curd, cheesecloth etc for a small amount.
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Old 06-18-2016, 09:19 PM   #7
BernardSmith
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I started making cheese a few months ago and I think that it is fun ... and relatively, easy, though mozzarella is not so easy... If your milk source pasteurizes the milk at too high a temperature you will find it very difficult to obtain stretchy cheese. If the milk is OK then you want the cheese to have a pH of about 5.2 and you want to heat the cheese so that it will be at around 170 - 180 F
I use kefir made from kefir grains as my culture (it contains both mesophilic and thermophilic bacteria and yeast) and according to Asher also contains bacteria you need for many surface cultures.
Making a press is easy - a very simple press can be made from two 2 gallon fermenting buckets. You drill a few holes in the second bucket and place the form or mold between the upper and lower bucket. A gallon of whey or water weighs 8 lbs - so you can fill the top bucket for a weight of 16 lbs. If you place a tray atop the bucket you can place a 3 , 5 or 6 gallon carboy on top of the tray and so press the cheese with up to 48 lbs. A more stable press can be made from two pieces of wood (about 24 inches by 6) drilled to accept 4 threaded rods (about 12 - 18 inches) and you then place appropriate carboys on top of the top strip of wood

Best books? David Asher's The Art of Natural Cheesemaking. Gianaclis Caldwell's Mastering Artisan Cheesemaking. Ricki Carroll's Home Cheese Making is very popular but IMO it is more focused on recipes rather than principles and there seems to be many very different recipes for every cheese so what you want to get a handle on is what undergirds the recipe rather than a specific recipe (how important are the specific weights for the times listed? How important are the temperatures listed for cooking the curds? How important are the size of the curds you cut for the kind of cheese you are making? How significant is the mix of curd size, temperature, cooking time, and weights?)
One gallon of milk makes about 1 lb of cheese.


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Old 06-18-2016, 10:01 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grapeman View Post
With a bit of rennet you can make a farmer's cheese out of pasteurized cows milk even. It is a little milder than goat cheese. A gallon will yield a fair amount at around a quart or so. You can mix in your favorite herbs with it or even make a spicy blend and it is delicious. Not much is needed to do it. Get some cheesecloth and unless you want to make a hard cheese not much else is needed. You can buy an inexpensive kit with a the little stuff like a special knife for cutting the curd, cheesecloth etc for a small amount.
visited a church lady friend one day as she made a batch of cheese...heated milk...stirred in some stuff...it got lumpy...she poured into cheesecloth...hung from a cabinet door knob and over her sink. It make a real nice soft cheese. she saved the whey for other uses, what I don't know.

I have been wanting to give it a try ever since! My Stepmother used to make goat milk riccota cheese and then made manicotti and is still the best I have ever eaten...she said that was a pretty easy and fast cheese to make.

 
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Old 06-19-2016, 05:25 AM   #9
BernardSmith
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You can use some of the the whey to inoculate your next batch of cheese (that was a traditional way of making cheese and is known as back slopping) or you can drink the whey or use it for bread making or to feed vegetables in your garden. You can also use whey to make ricotta.

 
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Old 06-19-2016, 11:41 AM   #10
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Bernard, thank you for your excellent evaluation of cheesemaking books. I have been looking for a while for the "right" cheese books to buy, and you made it all clear to me. I don't want or need recipes, those are easy to find with websearches. It's the why and how of the process that I want to learn so I can understand then create.

BTW whey is excellent on tomato plants. The extra calcium prevents those soft brown to black bad spots that tastes so bad if you bite into them.

Pam in cinti

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