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Old 04-20-2017, 06:10 PM   #131
joeswine
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Making Extracts
All recipes are measured out with one quart Ball Jar.
Citrus Extract: Consists of The zest of 2 limes, the zest of 2 lemons, and the zest of 2 grapefruits, and the remainder is ever Kleer.
Coffee Extract: fill Ball jar up with roasted coffee beans (your choice), fill the balance of the Ball jar with Ever Kleer.
Cinnemon Extract- ~approx. 12 sticks per Ball jar, top up with Ever Kleer
Lemon extract- The Zest of 12 lemons per jar, top up with Ever Kleer
Orange extract: The zest of approx.. 8 oranges per jar. Valenzia oranges work best but any type will do.
Key Lime Extract: 1 bag of key limes with the limes cut in half.
Vanilla Extract: 6 Madagascar Vanilla Beans, sliced length wise. Put all 6 in a ball jar and top off with Ever Kleer.
At the end of one full year its best to pour the extract through some sort of filter (I strain mine through a coffee filter) and add some additional zest of the same type back to it and top it off with Ever Kleer.
Making Simple Syrup
Basic mix consists of : 2 qt. ball jars of cane sugar to 1 qt. ball jar of water.
Process:
Place measured out sugar into a metal pot. Add the water to the mix (It’s a 2 to 1 ratio-mix). Bring the mixture to a boil, constantly stirring from the beginning of the process to the end until the liquid is clear. Have the ball jars already sanitized and ready for filling. Bring the simple syrup TO the jar and and funnel it into them (make sure your funnel is clean, too!) to fill them up. It will be hot so be very careful. Place the lids and metal rings onto the jars to seal them.
Note: we put the very hot liquid into the jars while it is hot so as it cools it creates a vacuum seal to keep the mixture good. Done this way, your simple syrup will have a very long shelf life.
Zesting Made Simple
Zesting is the process of the removal of the color of most citrus fruits and other entities that are oil extracted (for their essence). We use a micro plane zester to accomplish our end. See pictures. (If you do not have a micro plane zester you can use a fine cheese grater (Your goal is to get the color off the fruit, not the pitch, which is the “white stuff” underneath the very top layer of the fruit.)
1.jpg   2.jpg   3.jpg   4.jpg   5.jpg  

6.jpg   10.jpg   7A.jpg   P1030100.jpg   P1030104.jpg  


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Old 04-28-2017, 03:37 PM   #132
joeswine
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Making Extracts


All recipes are measured out with one quart Ball Jar.

Citrus Extract: Consists of The zest of 2 limes, the zest of 2 lemons, and the zest of 2 grapefruits, and the remainder is ever Kleer.
Coffee Extract: fill Ball jar up with roasted coffee beans (your choice), fill the balance of the Ball jar with Ever Kleer.
Cinnamon Extract- ~approx. 12 sticks per Ball jar, top up with Ever Kleer
Lemon extract- The Zest of 12 lemons per jar, top up with Ever Kleer
Orange extract: The zest of approx.. 8 oranges per jar. Valencia oranges work best but any type will do.
Key Lime Extract: 1 bag of key limes with the limes cut in half.
Vanilla Extract: 6 Madagascar Vanilla Beans, sliced length wise. Put all 6 in a ball jar and top off with Ever Kleer.
At the end of one full year its best to pour the extract through some sort of filter (I strain mine through a coffee filter) and add some additional zest of the same type back to it and top it off with Ever Kleer.


Making Simple Syrup

Basic mix consists of : 2 qt. ball jars of cane sugar to 1 qt. ball jar of water.
Process:
Place measured out sugar into a metal pot. Add the water to the mix (It’s a 2 to 1 ratio-mix). Bring the mixture to a boil, constantly stirring from the beginning of the process to the end until the liquid is clear. Have the ball jars already sanitized and ready for filling. Bring the simple syrup TO the jar and and funnel it into them (make sure your funnel is clean, too!) to fill them up. It will be hot so be very careful. Place the lids and metal rings onto the jars to seal them.
Note: we put the very hot liquid into the jars while it is hot so as it cools it creates a vacuum seal to keep the mixture good. Done this way, your simple syrup will have a very long shelf life.

Zesting Made Simple

Zesting is the process of the removal of the color of most citrus fruits and other entities that are oil extracted (for their essence). We use a micro plane zestier to accomplish our end. See pictures. (If you do not have a micro plane zestier you can use a fine cheese grater (Your goal is to get the color off the fruit, not the pitch, which is the “white stuff” underneath the very top layer of the fruit.)
this was the first time I attempted to make a lemon cello (back in the days) and soon found out it was all wrong, making the extract was the first step ,then simple syrup and the final addition of ever Kleer, but not only was it made in stages it had to be put together in stages as well this way it comes out to your taste ,not to sweet not to harsh but to your liking every time..by using a soup pot and adding all the lemon extract and then the everklreer to create the overall volume .I could then adjust the sweetness to taste with the addition of simple syrup just like making a sauce. Got it!
5.jpg   1 Bar Jars.jpg   2 fill both jars with syrup.jpg   3 Add to mixing vessel.jpg   4 fill both with extract.jpg  

5 Add to mixingvegges.jpg   6 it will seperate.jpg   7 Stir well.jpg   8 add 2-3 drops yellow food dye.jpg   9 final stir.jpg  

10 bottled.jpg   IMG_20140501_191437967.jpg   IMG_20140501_191448329.jpg   measured simple syrup.jpg  


 
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Old 05-02-2017, 05:50 PM   #133
pip
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I've been experimenting with flavor extracts using gelatin (although i've switched to agar agar, which is much faster). It's actually great fun, and really packs a flavor punch in a batch of wine. So far i've only used them for back sweetening but this morning i found nearly 200mls of a mango essence had dripped out overnight from about 300grams of mango mash and half a cup of water.

The syrup is delicious, really amazingly delicious. I had a spoon full and had to grab hold of myself so that i didnt just drink it all. I measured the sg of the syrup and it came in at 1.064 which got me wondering whether anyone has used a largish quantity of gelatin extract as a primary fermenting base? If so, are there any pitfalls, things to look out for? Would this be something worth experimenting with?

 
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Old 05-02-2017, 09:48 PM   #134
Mismost
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Joe....is that food color you are adding drops of to the extract?

I made a quart of Myers Lemon everclear extract....but it is not yellow at all...kinda of dull orange. I take it the food coloring is get that nice yellow color?

BTW...what do you use the cinnamon extract for? add to what?


 
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Old 05-03-2017, 05:32 AM   #135
joeswine
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no that's as is,the color is the color,see the process? Neve used galitin,the thickness from the simple syrup should be the correct viscosity for .cello.but hay have a creative adventure anyway.

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Old 05-14-2017, 09:09 AM   #136
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lets make one....
1 rinse berries - Copy (2).jpg   2 add to the pan - Copy (2).jpg   3 add juice - Copy (2).jpg   4 change colors - Copy (2).jpg   5 add a lid for a few mins - Copy (2).jpg  

6 change colors and smoosh - Copy (2).jpg   7 more cooked down - Copy (2).jpg   8 finished f pak - Copy (2).jpg   9  Add to bag - Copy (2).jpg  

 
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Old 06-10-2017, 02:26 PM   #137
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Basic Wine Chemistry

Chaptalization is the process of adding sugar to unfermented grape developed by the French chemist Jean-Antoine-Claude Chaptal, for whom it was named. Contrary to popular belief, this process does not make the wine sweeter but only artificially inflates the alcohol content. Additionally, the sugar in chaptalized wine cannot be tasted.
Potassium Metabisulfite is a common wine or must additive, where it forms sulfur dioxide gas (SO2). This both prevents most wild microorganisms from growing, and it acts as potent antioxidant, protecting both the color, and delicate flavors of wine.
Typical dosage is ¼ tsp potassium metabisulfite, per 6 gallon bucket of must (yielding roughly 75ppm of SO2) prior to fermentation, and ½ tsp per 6 gallon bucket (150 ppm of SO2) at bottling.
Winemaking equipment is sanitized by spraying with a 1% SO2 (2 tsp potassium metabisulfite per L) solution.
Potassium Sorbate is used to inhibit molds, and yeasts in wine. Also known affectionately as “wine stabilizer”, potassium sorbate produces sorbic acid when added to wine. It serves two purposes. When active fermentation has ceased and the wine is racked for the final time after clearing, potassium sorbate will continue fermenting any residual sugar into CO2 and alcohol, but when they die no new yeast will be present to cause future fermentation. When a wine is sweetened before bottling, potassium sorbate is used to prevent refermentation when used in conjunction with potassium metabisulfite. It is primarily used with sweet wines, sparkling wines and some hard cider but may be added to table wines which exhibits difficulty in maintaining clarity after fining.

 
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Old 07-02-2017, 01:22 PM   #138
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Joe, im about to try and make a blueberry concentrate/fpack for my blueberry wine, ill be reracking the bluberry wine tonight and adding the homaemade fpack to it. I already dosed the batch of wine with kmeta, given im using fresh fruit for fpack is it nessecary to add kmeta to the fpack before adding it to my wine?
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Old 07-02-2017, 03:04 PM   #139
joeswine
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If you're adding it to the primary,then no the chemicals will be added in the final process.however if you're adding it after you placed you chems you should .

 
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Old 07-02-2017, 04:18 PM   #140
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joeswine View Post
If you're adding it to the primary,then no the chemicals will be added in the final process.however if you're adding it after you placed you chems you should .
Thank you sir👍🏻

 
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