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Wine Making & Grape Growing Forum > Wine Making > Country Fruit Winemaking > Using Frozen Fruit?
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Old 01-02-2009, 04:32 PM   #1
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Default Using Frozen Fruit?

Are there any general ideas on using frozen fruit? As you can well imagine, fresh fruit can be outrageously expensive here, especially berries. Has anyone else had any successes, or failures using frozen?
Troy

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Old 01-02-2009, 04:54 PM   #2
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Frozen fruit is fine and sometimes better then grocery store fruit as they are typically picked too early so as not to rot before they hit the stands and never develope all the sugar and flavor that a wine really needs to overpower an abv. Even if you buy fresh fruit you should freeze most fruits as it helps break up the cellular structure of the fruit and kets the pectic enzyme that you will add do a better job of extracting more color and flavor of the fruit.

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Old 01-02-2009, 06:37 PM   #3
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Troy, just a note on frozen fruit. I am lucky enough to have access to about 24 elderberry bushes and am able to get fresh berries. Trouble is, I'm usually too busy to make my wine right away, so I freeze the cleaned berries till I'm ready. I believe Wade is correct about the fruit breaking down easier and letting the pectic enzyme do it's job.

Jimmy

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Old 01-02-2009, 08:52 PM   #4
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Do this especially with crab apples, they are togh little critters to do anything with but once they have been frozen for a week and then thawed out, you can then squish them with you bare hands no problem. I use the Dolce Crab apples not the tiny nasty crab apples.

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Old 01-03-2009, 04:37 AM   #5
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Troy,

I freeze nearly all my fruit.
I even freeze dandelions for making wine.

When harvesting there is not always enough time to
collect all the fruit you need.
So collect whatever you can, CLEAN IT FIRST and then freeze it.
Next you can use it whenever you want.

At this moment my winemaking freezer (yes I have
a separate one for winemaking) is full with rhubarb,
elderberries, blackberries, dandelion petals and some
apples and banana's.

Advantage is that the fruit will become meshy when it
thaws. That is, like the others said, from the cell-structures
breaking down. This is actually a good thing as it makes the
juice better available for us.

I wrote an essay on rhubarb 2 year ago and how to
process it you can find it here:
http://wijnmaker.blogspot.com/2007/06/scroll-down-for-english-text-al-lange.html

Now freezing has another advantage.
When processing hard fruit like apples or pears everyone
tells you to use a press. but a press is an expensive piece of equipment and just used a few times a year.
You can also use a freezer !!!!

I demonstrated how to process apples without expensive
equipment on my web-log:

http://wijnmaker.blogspot.com/2008/09/appeltje-voor-de-dorst-apple-day.html

So to summarise it all in one sentence:
Freezing fruit is actually one of the best things you can do.

Luc

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Old 01-03-2009, 02:01 PM   #6
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Appreciate the advice, makes perfect sense, was considering what was available at the store pre frozen, and if they should have some type fresh I will be sure to freeze it first, provided the price is reasonable. Not interested in anything in particular, open to any type, ready to graduate from concentrated juice to fruit. Shouldn't have any problem freezing it, temperatures here have been hovering around -40F, with -50F likely, and no end in sight. Thats not wind chill either, yikes!!!!!!!! Troy

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Old 01-03-2009, 02:09 PM   #7
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Luc
Thanks for the info about making juice from apples without expensive
equipment... I saved that to my PC for the future..

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Old 01-03-2009, 02:31 PM   #8
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When making a wine from apples or any other fruit that browns very fast like an apple use Ascorbic acid in the primary. It will not hinder your fermenation at all and it will keep your whires white and pinks pink instead of brown.

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Old 01-04-2009, 06:59 AM   #9
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Wade,

http://wijnmaker.blogspot.com/2008/03/bruin-worden-van-appels-browning-of.html



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Old 01-04-2009, 07:54 AM   #10
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While we are this discussion of frozen fruit, I was at the market today and the cheapest frozen fruit I could find was strawberries, 4 lbs. for 17$US, quess I'll be starting with fresh anyway. Seen some nice pears for like 90cents/pound, didnt get any cause I was hoping you might give me a simple recipe to make my transition to using real fruit. At 4$/lb i guess I could go anyway. is there such a thing as a fruit wine for beginners? Kinda wondering about bannanas, or cantelope, I can afford those. Any simple ideas?Thanks
for any suggestions, still would like to use a concentrate as a base. But would consider bottled juice of any kind and augment it with fresh fruit.
Troy

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